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Letters: Utahns boiled frogs

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  • Steve Cottrell Centerville, UT
    May 17, 2013 8:07 a.m.

    Common Core does nothing to restrict those who would go well beyond the minimum standards prescribed. Schools generally, and all students, have opportunities to do more than the minimum, whether that be with the Common Core standards, or the Utah State Core standards.

  • RedShirt USS Enterprise, UT
    May 16, 2013 8:51 a.m.

    To "The Real Maverick" the irony of your statement is that you show that you are not only closed minded, but you are burying your head in the sand and refuse to understand anything about Common Core. My children are experiencing the disaster that is common core. The methodologies used will doom our children to educational failure. Their plans sound great on paper, but in practice fail. The math and english programs will set us back.

    The teaching methodologies used in common core math push algebra and geometry before a child has an understanding of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The program pushes meat when the child can only eat strained peas.

    To "Open Minded Mormon" actually the LDS were libertarians when the Democrat party was libertarian. Democrats are now progressives, which is the complete opposite of where LDS members stand. The LDS church didn't change, the Democrats did.

  • Denise L. American Fork, UT
    May 15, 2013 11:45 p.m.

    How about gathering your talking points and trite comparisons and slipping into my classroom for a visit?
    Come see how Common Core is opening a new world of interesting, challenging, real-world text that actually helps kids get excited about reading and learning again. Come see how my students are learning to inquire and problem solve – individually and collaboratively- as they will need to do in the work place. Come see how teachers are breaking out of tired, old routines to model close reading, innovative strategies, and clear thinking. Come feel the buzz for learning that is engaging kids and teachers in ways I haven’t seen for years.
    Is Common Core perfect? Of course not. Should we be alert and watchful for governmental control and odd-ball data base abuses? Certainly. We always have the responsibility and right to monitor the material presented to our children as well as information gathered about them. Don’t go all “conspiracy theory” on us. Oh, and I’m a right-wing, conservative, former state Republican convention delegate in case you’re wondering.
    Leave your frogs at the door and come visit my classroom.

  • Open Minded Mormon Everett, 00
    May 15, 2013 11:27 a.m.

    The old Boiling Frog analogy...

    You mean like watching the once very liberal Utah Mormon Democrats shifting 180 degrees over the last 75 years into uber-conservative Republicans?

  • Irony Guy Bountiful, Utah
    May 15, 2013 10:41 a.m.

    Irony of the day: The boiled frog story is bogus. When a frog gets too hot, it will jump regardless of how gradual the heating is. The same is true of common core: if the teachers don't like it, they'll do what they want anyway. They have some autonomy behind the classroom door.

  • The Real Maverick Orem, UT
    May 15, 2013 9:21 a.m.

    You know, it's paranoid and close-minded letters like these which have hurt the right wing more than anything else. You can't keep going along in politics saying no to everything, obstructing everything, being paranoid about everything, and offering absolutely nothing as an alternative.

    See, in the real world, radical polarization just doesn't work. Try something Scott! You may not love the common core but give it a shot. You can't just stand idly by doing nothing!

    The last time we were this polarized was in the 1860s. We all know what happened then.

    If the right wing wants to become relevant again they need to stop with the language and message demonstrated in this letter. Come to the table and offer realistic alternatives. Don't just say no and accuse everything of being some large government commie conspiracy which wants to kill local control.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    May 15, 2013 9:08 a.m.

    Scott, I get the feeling you've got a dog in this hunt somewhere.

  • Ultra Bob Cottonwood Heights, UT
    May 15, 2013 8:23 a.m.

    I wish there were public schools owned and operated by our national government in competition with the state, local and private schools owned and operated by private interests. And that parents and students had the freedom to choose which to attend.

    The federal schools could teach the basic skills of education giving the student the tool of learning. The state and private schools could indoctrinate the students as desired according to the needs of the state.

    Students could attend one or more schools to obtain the mix of learning and indoctrination required. The federal schools would be financed by the national government and the other schools by their own means.

    Taxes on the total general public would pay for the federal schools. No federal money would be given to the other schools.

  • Mike Richards South Jordan, Utah
    May 15, 2013 6:47 a.m.

    I just re-read Article 1, Section 8, which enumerates the duties authorized by the People. There is nothing in there about education. The closest clause is "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries;". Anyone can clearly see that that clause does not authorize the Federal Government to oversee education.

    Instead of fighting over every little thing that the Federal Government does that is not authorized, how about demanding that the Federal Government do only those things that we have authorized it to do? How about cutting the Federal Government down to its proper size and let it handle ONLY those duties that we and the States cannot handle?