Comments about ‘Lois M. Collins: Hidden fees everywhere — just give me the price’

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Published: Tuesday, May 7 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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toosmartforyou
Farmington, UT

Absolutely I agree with this article! Banks are soooooooo worried about losing money and they are making it hand-over-fist. Airlines used to provide service but no longer do for the casual traveler (sound like banks?). And worst of all now, for a small business, the US Congress (Senate, anyway) wants to add sales tax to purchases. Gimmie a break, politicians!!

Timj
South Jordan, UT

Other countries include sales tax in prices, so you can actually buy a $3.00 box of cereal for three dollar bills. Of course, they then figure the sales tax themselves, but the buying process is much simpler for the consumer.

Mark l
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

There's no such thing as a free lunch.

The biggest scam mentioned in this piece is the mobile phone two year contract. If you add up the price you pay over two years, the cost of that 'free' phone, you would be surprised. I prefer to pay the fee up front, and then I don't have to have a contract. My monthly price is lower, and I can cancel any time for any reason.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

"Greed is Good"; the new American motto.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

I agree wholeheartedly. Airfares are the worst, but others are trying to follow suit. There is no such thing as a real price for a lot of things anymore. Everything is on sale, like the $99 airfare to someplace. But then there are the levies, fees, surcharges, riders, taxes, adjustments, modifiers, upgrades, you name it. They've gotten creative at finding things to charge for and what to call them. It's insidious, and unfair to the consumer.

Ultra Bob
Cottonwood Heights, UT

So, is business imitating government or does government imitate business in the multitude of fees, usually called taxes in government.

With all the different taxes and exceptions and exemptions does anyone really know how much he pays for government?

toosmartforyou
Farmington, UT

@ Ultra Bob

Not only don't we know how much we pay, we don't know for what we pay.

We know that gasoline taxes pay for roads but why aren't they kept painted and repaired? Now they want a "mileage tax" which is an excuse to increase tax revenue. If I use a tank of fuel a month versus a tank a week, I have already paid either 4 times the amount of gas tax or 1/4th. So it is mileage driven already.

We paid Social Security for years, only to have Congress rob the fund for other things.

How much was the building permit on your home? Your City used the money for parks or the Mayor's pet project or to hire another fireman, etc. It didn't cost anywhere near the amount you were charged for the inspection and plan fees to provide that service, even if the "impact fees" went as directed.

Businesses that gouge can go out of business, but the government is always there taking whatever they want and refusing to buy another snowplow and truck with an additional driver as the city population and number of streets grows.

Go figure.

the old switcharoo
mesa, AZ

I went to the optometrist yesterday and the have a new "fitting fee" for contacts if your prescription has changed. $45 bucks for them to have MY DAUGHTER put them in and say, "yep, they are good." Ok, that's another $45.

Fitting fee for contacts...... And they'll wonder why everyone decides to buy contacts online instead.

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

Amen

I remember years ago, in another state, getting a ticket for an expired inspection. When i asked the police officer how much the ticket would be he told me it ranged from $20-$25. I was shocked when i had to pay over $100! Yes, the fine was $25, but the "fees" were over $75.

One of the ridiculous fees from the airlines are paying extra for " premium" seats. No, we're not talking about seats in business or first class. The "premium" seats are in coach. One can pay extra to be packed in like a sardine!

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