Comments about ‘Are you a tax cheat if you shop online tax-free?’

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Published: Sunday, May 5 2013 8:31 a.m. MDT

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killpack
Sandy, UT

@TheRock

I feel your pain. Because I am underemployed, I decided to start a small business peddling my mother's homemade bread. That's right. I sell homemade bread. You would not believe the hoops I have to jump through just so I can sell homemade bread. Not multiple products to people in multiple states. Homemade bread to my neighbors. Well, my one-employee bread company doesn't have an accounting department either. So when the Utah State Tax Commission sends nasty letters saying I didn't file even if I did, and saying that I owe money, even if I don't, I can't just pass them on to the CFO and say 'here, take care of this.' I have to take care of it. And I don't even know how! And I sell ONE product! To people in my neighborhood! It's really no wonder to me why this economy is so horrible and why so many people are underemployed (like me) or unemployed altogether. I can't even imagine what it's like to manage a real business. There is certainly no incentive in this environment for me to ever become one.

Badger55
Nibley, Ut

Some of the people who commented on this article need to check out the SCOTUS ruling on Quill Corp. v. North Dakota. It is unconstitutional for a state to charge a use tax on online purchases when the physical location of the business is located in a different state. Unfortunately, they also ruled that it can be changed with legislation from congress. This will be a nightmare for online retailers as well as the 50 states trying to sift through all the taxes from everyone in the Country. Sounds like a prime opportunity to let more revenue slip through the governmental cracks. They are more like crevasses these days.

Paul in MD
Montgomery Village, MD

@CB, Social Security isn't a savings account, and it isn't a pension. It's essentially an insurance policy against living long enough to not be able to work. When it was enacted, the average life expectancy was less than 65, so just over half of the people paying into it were not expected to live long enough to draw from it.

John C. C.
Payson, UT

What about illegal is it that people don't understand? Deport illegal buyers to the states they bought from if they refuse to accept the rule of law.

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