Comments about ‘My view: Protect the Greater Canyonlands’

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Published: Tuesday, April 2 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

We absolutely need to protect as much of this land as possible.

Moab, UT

Practically all of this land is owned by the govt. So just who is it necessary to protect it from? I enjoy it just the way it is.

Counter Intelligence
Salt Lake City, UT

It would be wise to actually include more land in the Canyonlands National Park, as well as Capitol Reef (which has major landmarks like Factory Butte and the Henry Mountains outside its boundaries) and create new parks such as San Rafael and Escalante - because parks allow more flexibility in land use than monuments and are bigger magnets for tourism dollars

Thinkin\' Man
Rexburg, ID

I was just at Dead Horse Point. The oil field there doesn't detract in the least.

dee downing
Park City, UT

Governor Herbert???? Response,to Ms. Excell? Governor Herbert, why do you persist in representing oil and gas interests, instead of the majority of Utahans? Seems like oil an gas are being driven down our throats. How about ASKING what we want?

Jackson, MI

Excell does an "excell"ent job of outlining the need to protect Utah's spectacular wild lands--from developers, mineral exploitation, off-road vehicle use, and other destructive activities. As an out-of-stater who manages to get to Utah every couple years to hike, bike, float, and travel, I am not very excited about coming there to spend my money on seeing a new oil field or a chained forest. The area around Canyonlands should be part of the park itself. President Obama can do the next best thing by creating a national monument out of it.

Price, Utah

Buffer all these parks but buffer the Mount Olympus Widerness also. Take down all the development on the upper east side of SLC.

Green River, WY

This land belongs to all Americans and deserves to be protected as such. If we give this land up for development we can never get it back in it's pristine state. More waffle stompers, less steel toes!


Sadly, if these lands are not protected they will not become the private sanctuaries of the privileged, but an industrialized landscape acting as an ATM for wealthy corporations, extracting the dirtiest energy sources in the world and leaving Utah devastated ecologically and financially (see: boom and bust cycles). Not only Greater Canyonlands should be protected, but all 9 million acres of wilderness designated in America's Red Rock Wilderness Act. It is the least we can do for future generations of Utahns and Americans to leave them a priceless, pristine legacy.

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