Comments about ‘Bikes are vehicles and must obey traffic laws’

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Published: Monday, March 25 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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embarrassed Utahn!
Salt Lake City, UT

I drove from SLC to Provo yesterday. On the way I was passed by no less than 30 cars going 80mph or more. I saw one person getting cited.

It doesn't matter what the law says. The solid-majority of Utahns break our speed laws every time they get in the car.

I'll apply the same deference while riding my bike.

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

As a car owner, I pay a lot to use the road in taxes and stuff. I know I can;t go into a bike lane, not even to make a right hand turn. I have rode my bike back in the day in SLC before the bike lane and Know what it's like to be forced off the road and crash. There is no charge to a bike. yet they have there own lane. What up with that.

higv
Dietrich, ID

Bikes can't go near as fast as cars though and are a nussiance if they are in front of a car.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Bikes can be vehicles when they have license, insurance and are capable of keeping up with traffic. Until then, the laws which should most closely apply are those of physics. From the perspective of physics and in context a frank hazard assessment, there really isn't a safe way to mix two such dramatically different modes of transportation in the same space. It is like trying to ride a horse on the 15.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Today, I was stopped at a red light when a bicycle came along on the SIDEWALK. The bike rider never looked left or right -- he had a green light. A woman who was making a left turn -- also on the green light -- apparently failed to see the bicycle approaching on the sidewalk. I thought I was going to see a bike rider get killed before my eyes.

The lady spotted him just in time but was nearly rear-ended by another car turning behind her. Who would have been at fault in that situation?

I'm afraid the driver might have been cited. But would that be right? She seemed to be doing everything she should have been doing. The bike was not where a reasonable driver would expect to find one. Her view of the bike may also have been obscured.

I'm not sure, but it seems that some bike riders either have a death wish or are simply trying to assert their "rights" on the road. Why do so many hug the white delineator, forcing drivers to slow down, when there may be ten or more feet of pavement to the right of them? Why?

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