Comments about ‘US envoy presses China over hacking, North Korea’

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Published: Wednesday, March 20 2013 11:30 a.m. MDT

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Badger55
Nibley, Ut

Just read that a Chinese foreign exchange student was caught dating a man twice her age that was a civilian defense contractor for the US. She learned classified information on U.S. nuclear weaponry, missile defenses and war plans. DOJ did not say whether she was a spy, but is looking into it. Might be nothing, but if Pearl Harbor taught us anything it is that actions speak louder than words.

Tators
Hyrum, UT

The article states "Beijing is locked in territorial feuds with Japan and several Southeast Asian nations that threaten to draw in the United States."
Having these feuds is not a direct attack on anyone... especially not the United States. I fail to understand why we insist on policing and becoming directly involved with the feuds and differences of almost every country in the world.
Yes, many are our allies. That means we have economic ties and other common interests. It also means we will support them in event of a direct military attack. But there are numerous ways of dealing with feuds and differences short of military intervention. That being the case, it's difficult to understand why we feel the need to get involved with anything short of direct military threats, as we so often do.
We are only 5% of the world's population and our interference tendencies tend to make many other countries of the world harbor resentment toward us. Besides that, we no longer have the economic reserves to keep getting involved so often with other country's affairs. It also tends to draw us into wars that the American people do not want.

JWB
Kaysville, UT

For our nation without long-term policies just draws itself into one crisis after another without a real thought process going into it. Our Secretary of the Treasury may pay his taxes but he is a politician grown in the same medium as President Obama. We don't have a budget for 5 years and go over to a country that owns some of our country's equity and show our power. Cyber-security is an important issue and it is ironic that South Korea, an arch enemy of China for 60 years gets hacked in their financial and computer systems while having talks with the Chinese. War without physical violence just the violence of not being able to get the funds a country's citizens need when they need them. Our country's banking systems pushed the ATMs and electronic banking but not the cyber protection to go with them. It is ironic that people in this country have to buy their own antivirus, anti-hacking packages and the banks are not secure. Our government systems at all levels get hacked and not defending our citizens against real threats. Our priorities in social systems that don't win but entitlements.

JWB
Kaysville, UT

Nuclear defense and the Chinese getting information from the United States of America through various methods, given and taken, have proved beneficial for their own process to improve their offensive, not just defensive posture. When the Chinese forced the United States Navy's P-3 electronic surveillance aircraft down and kept it for engineering backwards and forwards proved beneficial to know our type of systems, even though changed, now. They know the architecture and systems. We have gone to their country with the latest of our own commercial electronics of all types and shapes and sizes. They have the cleanest of rooms for electronics but people in the countryside of their cities can't breathe. Their beautiful rivers have become polluted with our industrial wastes produced from the products we buy. They have our intellectual property but we don't care as long as we get their products on our shelves. I remember when Wal-Mart used to say "Made in America" with pride. Now, you can't find anything, not even produce with that "Made in America" on a label. Some items that said United States of Mexico, which is sort of America. Pride in America is Obamacare.

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