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Comments about ‘More black smoke: Cardinals don't agree on pope’

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Published: Wednesday, March 13 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Tyler D
Meridian, ID

I continue to be baffled by the frequency of all this pomp and circumstance being reported in the DN. Putting aside for a moment the many doctrinal differences between the Catholic and LDS churches, I’m curious why this these proceedings are given so much attention in general, at least by non-Catholics.

And the only answer that seems plausible is that it is due to the large number of believers. That fact alone seems to make it worthy of our respect. Considering all the nonsense people have believed, en masse, throughout history this is not a very satisfying answer.

Imagine your reaction to reading historical accounts of the churches devoted to Zeus or Baal, both of which were followed by large percentages of ancient societies. That is exactly how all of this “picking a pope” stuff looks to a non-believer today…

joseywales
Park City, UT

Personally Tyler D, I think it's mostly because Mormons don't fully get Catholics, so there is some natural curiosity. I could care less who the next Pope is, I'm hoping he is someone who the devout Catholics admire and want to follow, but it's just kind of interesting to me, to watch throngs of people line up and wait to see the white smoke. I glad the Dnews gives coverage to other faiths, it's refreshing.

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@Tyler D
The state of Utah is 10% Catholic the second largest faith in Utah (unless we count unaffiliated as one) This article is in the "world and nation" section of the paper, are they not supposed to report on something that matters to roughly 1/7th the world?

CWJ
Layton, UT

Doctrinal differences aside, as a LDS member I am anxious to see who will lead the Catholic Church. Regardless of ones feelings about the next pope, it is still a dominant position for good in the world, and the next pope will push for the advocacy of strong families, charitable giving, and renewed peace throughout the world. For my Catholic friens, I pray that you are given the right leader for these tumoltuous times. You are deserving of a strong leader who will bring much stability to the Catholic church at large.

wrz
Pheonix, AZ

"Black smoke again: Cardinals don't agree on pope"

I think they should get off the dime and move ahead briskly with this procedure so they can stop polluting the atmosphere with black smoke.

ThornBirds
St.George, Utah

And.......
Diversity and understanding is a good thing! Education is valuable!! Diverse DN articles are welcome!
The more we try to understand why others think the way they do, why they believe the way they do, what their history is, and vise versa, the better off we human beings will be.
However, it will continue to be baffling to try to understand those people and groups, religious or not, who have no empathy or understanding of the less fortunate of our country and our world.

NedGrimley
Brigham City, UT

joseywales: "I could care less who the next Pope is" Did you mean to say you couldn't care less? Is your level of care regarding this matter at it's lowest, or could it be even lower? Obviously there must be some level of concern or you wouldn't have interjected into the conversation.

That said, alt134 had the perfect response to Tyler D. I agree.

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

"Considering all the nonsense people have believed, en masse, throughout history this is not a very satisfying answer. "

Ah yes. A common religious occurrence.

I always find it amusing when people of faith looks at the beliefs of others as "nonsense".

They are typically blind to how nonsensical their own beliefs seem to others.

wrz
Pheonix, AZ

@Tyler D:
Imagine your reaction to reading historical accounts of the churches devoted to Zeus or Baal, both of which were followed by large percentages of ancient societies."

You're forgetting the prominent position the Catholic Church had all through most of the history of the last 2000 years. That church is responsible for the retention of Christian thought and practice during that time from Constantine and before, to the present. True, the church has had it's dark hours such as the Spanish et. al., Inquisition and the throwing of what's his name (Galileo) into jail for his intransigence on his heliocentric concept on the earth/sun relationship. Whereas churches devoted to Zeus, Baal, etc., petered out centuries ago with but a handful of adherents at any given time. So... don't be too harsh.

Tyler D
Meridian, ID

@ atl134 – “are they not supposed to report on something that matters to roughly 1/7th the world?”

Perhaps you’re right… although do you think we’ll see the same level of reporting when the Dalai Lama or one of the main leaders of Islam dies?

But the main point I was trying to make was in my last two paragraphs and how all this looks to a non-believer… which is the same as when my kids discuss all the merits of their comic book super heroes, including all the dress up and play acting.

The difference though is that with my kids it’s all harmless fun and I know someday they’ll grow up and put aside childish things.

I don’t mean this to sound insulting, but wouldn’t you feel the same way if you were reading about all this with respect to Zeus, Baal or Poseidon or any of the other gods/superstitions of other current religions (e.g., Hinduism)?

@Wrz – “You're forgetting…”

Not really. Popularity and endurance through time of beliefs do not make them anymore true… useful perhaps, certainly as vehicles of power and control.

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@TylerD
"I don’t mean this to sound insulting, but wouldn’t you feel the same way if you were reading about all this with respect to Zeus, Baal or Poseidon or any of the other gods/superstitions of other current religions (e.g., Hinduism)? "

Considering a negligible amount of people today worship Zeus, Baal, or Poseiden I would be rather confused. I don't think it's really silly to see reporting on who is chosen to lead a religion. After all, those are influential selections. Regardless of whether or not you or I think it's silly it does have an impact on people.

joseywales
Park City, UT

Ned Grimley- Grammar police, you've got to love 'em. But actually thinking about it I was right. I actually could care less, but I choose not to at this time.So, because I have some level of concern left, I guess it's ok to interject? See what I'm saying? If I couldn't care less that shows I have no emotion left on the subject. That's when you wouldn't want to interject. But, my response wasn't so much about the Pope as it was that the Dnews was doing a story not of the local majority faith. You might have missed that while hopping onto correct grammar dot com.

NedGrimley
Brigham City, UT

joseywales: Thanks for the appropriate chastisement. Your totally right to call me out on that issue. But there are worse things then that. Most of them are real flustrating, but the ability to speak real English is taken for granite by so many. I would aks you to have compassion on me since I definately dont want to be on your bad side. Since I used to live in Lay-un, I should get a free pass. So for now, Ill leave it at that.

I would aks this question, If not for the grammar police, them who?

I knew I should have used the sarcasm font...

xert
Santa Monica, CA

Ned--I've always taken it that, when someone says, "I could care less," they are implying "I suppose I COULD care less if I chose to care at all...."

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