Comments about ‘Elder David A. Bednar speaks at CES fireside, says we must not shrink’

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Published: Sunday, March 3 2013 11:43 p.m. MST

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John C. C.
Payson, UT

I agree. Sometimes we choose to accept failure. It still hurts. I am fortunate to have lived long enough to have seen pains from my youth fade away. Meanwhile all I have learned from them remains. The bitter can eventually become sweet.

The bravest warrior is the one who focuses on the goal and does not dwell on the outcomes which cannot be controlled. I haven't really learned this fully until I build the courage to start going home teaching again.

Alfred
Pheonix, AZ

"Even with strong faith, many mountains will not be moved."

I guess I don't get it. The scriptures tell us: If you have the faith of a grain of mustard seed (representing a comparatively small amount) you can tell yon mountain to remove and it will be removed.

"And not all of the sick and infirmed will be healed."

Obviously not, else some would live forever having a continual blessing of healing performed with faith. But, it would seem a man in his youth (in the article) could/should be healed with a blessing and the exercise of faith so he could live out a normal life... which everyone should be entitled to.

"If all opposition were curtailed, if all maladies were removed, then the primary purposes of the Father's plan would be frustrated."

Then why even exercise any faith about healing the sick if such faith healing would/might be frustrating to the Father's plan?

This whole issue is very confusing.

donn
layton, UT

The Lord said to Moses, “Make a poisonous snake and set it on a pole. When anyone who is bitten looks at it, he will live.” So Moses made a bronze snake and put it on a pole, so that if a snake had bitten someone, when he looked at the bronze snake he lived. Numbers 21:8,9.

The image of the snake was to be a symbol of the curse that the Israelites were experiencing; by lifting the snake up on a pole Moses was indicating that the curse would be drawn away from the people – if they looked to it, which was a sign of faith.

(Jesus)Just as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness so must the Son of Man be lifted up: so that everyone who believes in him may have eternal life. John 3:14,15.

For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. 1 Cor 1:18

Gracie
Boise, ID

To Alfred: You're right, it is confusing. We only understand extremely complex issues vaguely until we have enough experience with the details. If we exercise enough faith in the plan of God for us individually, certain that he actually does have our eternal good at heart, then we'll have the required humility to be given bits and pieces of the answers to our confusion as we're able to digest them appropriately. It all becomes clear over time, learned through humility cloaked with hope and resolute faith. Lately I often think of a life metaphor for being sent from the pre-existent life to earth: it's as if we're sent from a safe military base into thick battles with a set of vital objectives, but we don't have the promise to return alive to the base from every mission. We can, though, expect to return to our heavenly home as fully-proven sons and daughters of God. That's why we're here. As it used to be said, we weren't promised a rose garden, and not anything close to it. While you're struggling with confusion of the moment, keep an eternal perspective.

BCSx2
South Jordan, UT

To Alfred:

You are correct that miracles are performed by faith. But the other ingredient is it has to be the Lord's will. All the faith in the world won't heal someone if the Lord's will is that they not be healed. When we learn of the miracles that have happened on the earth, those performing the miracles not only had faith, but were also so close to the spirit that they understand the Lord's will.

Joseph Smith had great faith but still lost children and had many other trials. He had sufficient faith to heal his children when they were sick, but that wasn't the will of the Lord. I believe the Lord doesn't give us all of our trials. Many come because we are imperfect beings, because of other's decisions etc. But then the Lord decides what good that trial can do for us, and knows whether we should go through the trial completely or have it removed.

Some people are healed, others aren't. Faith makes those miracles possible but not in opposition of the Lord's will.

SammyB
Provo, UT

The apostle Paul had a physical ailment that plagued him his whole life. He called it a thorn in the side. He healed many others but could not heal himself. He trusted that there was a purpose for it.

Moses and Enoch were slow of speech. Surely, God could have made them better speakers so they could do a better work??? Or does he expect us to have the courage to serve others in spite of our weaknesses?

Sometimes the Lord decides that it is better that we come into this life maimed (physically or mentally) in some way so through our trials we collect the tools necessary to become the most spiritually whole person possible. That way, as joint-heirs with Christ (as the New Testaments says) we can assist him to succor those who need succoring. Christ went below all things in his suffering, so he understands all we go through. If we also experience hard trials and grow from them, we also are better able to help others from a position of empathy and true charity. This is one of the main purposes for mortality.

Obama10
SYRACUSE, UT

I hope someday I have the faith "not to be healed".

Open Minded Mormon
Everett, 00

Alfred
Pheonix, AZ
"Even with strong faith, many mountains will not be moved."

I guess I don't get it. The scriptures tell us: If you have the faith of a grain of mustard seed (representing a comparatively small amount) you can tell yon mountain to remove and it will be removed.

============

You should listen to the entire FireSide.

Elder Bednar remarks were that we must make our will be in harmony with God's will first.

We can not ask for something contrary to God's will.
We don't tell God what to do,
but we must put ourselves in harmony with his will first.
THEN, he will grant us the blessing of our heart's desires.

It's not the other way around.

Brother Dave
Livermore, CA

Thanks Elder David Bednar and Sister Bednar for giving a Great Message at the CES Fireside
last night (March 3rd).

The subject was All about Priorities. Letting God's Will become one's own "personal" Will
is a tough concept for many to really understand and accomplish. Elder Bednar even used the word "Absorbed". Jesus Did Show this by His example, "Not my Will, But Thine be done".
This is definitely part of the Calvary and Resurrection message.

This I thought was a very appropriate "Easter" related subject, although I never heard the
word "Easter" mentioned in the Fireside messages.

Thanks Again! Elder and Sister Bednar for focusing on significant Eternal perspectives.

There are songs and Hymns that focus on these ideas too. "Jesus, Savior, Pilot Me" and "Jesus, Take the Wheel" are two examples.

Thanks Also to BYU-TV for making the broadcast of the Fireside available to us who live outside of the Intermountain Area.

Lord Bless!!

3GrandKeys
Walnut Creek, CA

@ Open Minded Mormon

"We can not ask for something contrary to God's will.
We don't tell God what to do,
but we must put ourselves in harmony with his will first.
THEN, he will grant us the blessing of our heart's desires."

That statement seems a bit out of whack with what I learned in LDS sunday school. Seek to know God's will? Yes. Ask nothing unless it's God's will? No. What do we see in Jacob 5:49-51. The Lord throws in the towel on his vineyard and tells his servant to burn it down, but the servant asks for more time and it's granted. I don't see God's will as a constant unyielding destiny for us. I think it can be as variable in real time as our faith is. Thus we must ask for our desires and not be ashamed but be grateful that there is a God willing to hear every request.

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: Tyler D : which do nothing to convince a non-believer. I asked how this doctrine impacted you personally.
Sorry #4, Imputation God has taken away the guilt of believers . Like(Amazing) grace that taught...my heart to fear. And Grace, my fears relieved. ... the hour I first believed. I had a very similar experience.
My one moment of communion with him and his grace. If I did not know the reality of it. I could not long for God’s presence. The peace of God, which transcends all understanding.
When I became a Christian and left the Mormon Church, I thought I was going to be divorced and separated from my children. Whenever I get the chance, I still share the Biblical Jesus with Mormons
RE: Bill in Nebraska ,He died for all mankind.
Salvation is not universal but based on the belief of each individual,(Romans 1:16,Heb 9:28; Ephesians 2:8-10.
…the love of God, because he laid down his life for us(believers) …(1 John 3:16) God on the cross.

johanngoethe
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

"...if all maladies were removed, then the primary purposes of the Father's plan would be frustrated." Removal of "some" maladies would presumably be OK?

…came to understand that not shrinking is more important than surviving. Thus, their experience was not primarily about living and dying; rather, it was about learning (learning what? God’s will?), living and becoming (becoming what? An absent father, a dead man, useless to mortality’s plan?) Trying to understand that kind of reasoning is detrimental to faith.
I have learned not to try to learn God’s will. Just “keep your nose clean” be hopeful and expect nothing while believing in an “unknowable, inscrutable” God.

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