Comments about ‘Christian school's lawsuit may test court ruling’

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Published: Tuesday, Jan. 29 2013 11:38 p.m. MST

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Hutterite
American Fork, UT

The only way religious freedom will be affirmed is if the ruling is that these people do not have to 'prove' their faith. Their religious freedom is inextricably tied to that of every other person in the land.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

This is the "Emperor's New Clothes" scenario the believers are striving to achieve under the guise of "religious freedom". They want to be able to identify and systematically discriminate against all those who do not "prove" that they see the invisible clothes of the Emperor of the Universe.

Religious people want "religious freedom" only in the sense that they want to be able to exclude nonbelievers from their companies, societies, and groups, but they don't want to be excluded from public, government, or secular aspects of society.

The hypocrisy is poignant, and has a long tradition among the predominant religions.

It was a scam when Hans Christian Andersen wrote the story, and it is a scam now.

jttheawesome
Scranton, PA

A few questions come to mind about this story.

1. Since this is a private, Christian school, does it not have the right to see to it that teachers are not only academically qualified, but also, that they are not "wolfs in sheep's clothing" trying to subvert their faith?

2. Since these teachers were already on staff, and already assumed to be Christians, why did they refuse to offer their faith credentials? Students applying for admission to Christian or church-run schools like BYU must do the same. So must pastors who are candidating at churches seeking a new minister.

3. Why would anyone who is not a professing Christian want to teach at a private Christian school in the first place? There are plenty of other institutions, both private and public, where they could work - and, likely, for better pay.

4. Why is it perfectly acceptable for secular institutions - especially but not limited to public ones - to prohibit or severely limit a Christian's right to speak out on Christian issues on campus, and at times even off campus, while at the same time, allowing and even promoting other faiths to practice openly.

What think ye?

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