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Comments about ‘Guns play role in shorter life expectancy in the U.S.’

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Published: Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013 10:18 p.m. MST

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DN Subscriber 2
SLC, UT

First, the story is from Associated Press, well known as a liberal bias advocacy outfit, not unbiased reporters.

Second, "correlation is not causation."
Ice cream sale go up in the summer. Crime goes up in the summer. But,ice cream sales do not cause increased crime in the summer.

Perhaps if they compared some other demographic information about the early deaths in the U.S. that will tell a lot more about causation. Who are the young people killing and being killed that skew the figures, and where do they live? (Do the research!)

Third- The timing of the release of this story is just a little too convenient, on the day that Biden meets with anti-gun groups. And, Feinstein has been working on her gun ban bill for over a year, plenty of time for a coordinated propaganda push.

Other life expectancy factors include diet, exercise, alcohol use, mileage driven in automobiles, drug abuse, and many other things.

This is not a "gun issue" no matter how hard the media spins it!

AmPatriot
Taylorsville, UT

Pathetic attempt to falisfy and create lies that and information that is irrelevant and biased. Life expectancy has never been relevance to the question of guns, freedoms, and violence, its all about the quality of life, not the number of years living in prisons. Life expectancy among oppressed nations is always shorter because or government corruption and not gun possession.

Screwdriver
Casa Grande, AZ

The latest line is that guns don't kill, movies and video games do.

And we can't talk about guns until people don't die of any other reason.

As far as I'm concerned you can have your guns, I'm certainly not crazy enough to try to take them from people crazy enough to believe I would. See how that works?

For all the certainty the gun nuts have that the government is going to take their guns they can't nail it down who would actually come to the door to do it.

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

Chicago has very strict gun control laws and still has more murders than soldiers killed in Afghanistan every year. For the 16 trillionth time, blaming guns for crime is like blaming matches for arson or spoons for obesity. We are witnessing the inevitable consequences of secular progressive, moral relativism in America and it is impossible to keep guns out of the hands of people who don't understand the difference between good and evil behavior. James Holmes, Jared Loughner and Adam Lanza have no idea of the difference and one can only ask, why not? When we answer that question real progress can be made in stopping these acts of violence. Until we can answer that question, we will continue to have more of these mass murders and all the gun control laws in the world will not stop them!

FT
salt lake city, UT

No doubt there is a media bias to support gun control. But its never had an affect on gun legislation. Statistically, gun owners are more likely to have their weapons used on them or someone else in their household. That's their right and more proof to support Darwin's theory.

KDave
Moab, UT

You cannot compare stats with other countries. Example: In the U.S. life begins at the moment of birth were-as other countries do not begin life until the the child is as old as one year. This alone greatly skews life expectancy rates. There are many more differences.

UT Brit
London, England

@KDave

Haha which countries do this? Have you got anything to back that up? I have lived in a few countries around the world and this is news to me.

PeanutGallery
Salt Lake City, UT

This sounds more like a deceptive propaganda piece, not a news report.

EDM
Castle Valley, Utah

Good grief! No amount of statistics, other measures, or examples will ever convince some of you that gun violence is a problem in the US. Is it just too hard to swallow that you might not be living in the best place on earth today? Of course any place can be the best place if that's what the individual makes it. So for heaven's sake don't be so defensive that you refuse to see an obvious problem.

Read the article for what it is: a highlight of one small aspect of the larger problem of lagging life expectancy in the US.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "EDM" you try to blame the deaths on gun violence, when the problem is the US culture. Even if you get rid of the guns, it will change to something else. In Japan it went from guns to swords and knives. What next, do we restrict the purchase of knives and swords? What after that, axes and baseball bats?

EDM
Castle Valley, Utah

Red Shirt,

Maybe you're right. We're barbarians. So then let's change the culture.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "EDM" no, that is not the problem. The problem is that we don't take mental health issues seriously enough. We don't have the bonds between neighbors to be able to tell somebody that their child is mentally unstable and that we are concerned with their family's well being.

The issue is how do you change culture? Do you think that we can legislate the change, or does this have to come from within people?

Rural sport fan
DUCHESNE, UT

EDM: If you actually LOOK at the statistics, you see that outside of the major metropolitan areas, gun violence is almost negligible.

It isn't guns that are the problem, it is cities! The statistics say that if you have a large city, gun violence goes up!

The obvious solution is easy to see. Ban the cities!

See how silly things sound if you interpret then in the same ways the media and politicians do?

FT: That is an absolutely bogus statistic. Can you cite the source?

rnoble
Pendleton, OR

My father was a skilled shootist but my mother would not have them in the house. So my father gave up the hobby and also the hunting that he had formerly done. I also became somewhat proficient but never had the time or inclination to train my children beyond gun safety and they in turn showed no interest. So I own guns but do not use them anymore and my children do not own guns.

Still with all of that past I am sure my children could become proficient if the need arose and I do not want to give up my guns even when I don't hunt or target shoot anymore. I may need to return to the field to obtain food or I may need to protect myself or my loved ones and I believe I am still skilled enough to do that. I believe I have a very big barrier to my gun ownership in that I doubt I would desire to kill just to protect property. I am good enough and some of my guns are capable of just shooting off an arm or leg but that could also be fatal. What do I do?

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