Comments about ‘In our opinion: The gift of forgiveness is at the center of what this Christmas season symbolizes’

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Published: Sunday, Dec. 23 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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John Charity Spring
Back Home in Davis County, UT

This editorial is absolutely correct. We need the influence of the true spirit of Christmas more than ever. In fact, nothing is needed more in these dark times.

Unfortunately, the left wing has been relentless in its quest to eliminate all Christian influence from the holiday season. Indeed, leftist judges have removed all mention of Christ from Christmas celebrations in the schools and city halls.

The time has come to take a stand in support of goodness and light. The majority of good citizens must rise up against the leftist and demand the right to celebrate the true spirit of Christmas.

There You Go Again
Saint George, UT

Them v US...

Thoughtful comment?

Civil Dialogue?

The point of this article is forgiveness.

Please save the Right-wing diatribes for another forum.

Robbie Parker's statement of forgiveness in the face of unspeakable heartbreak should hopefully reach out to all of us...

Hopefully.

happy2BGrandma
Pleasant Grove, UT

Thank you so much for this timely article. Blame instead of forgiveness often jumps out of stories of difficulty and heartache. These examples you give do not show weakness, but instead, true strength. Anger and hatred does not move anyone or any culture forward. I am grateful for the correct teachings of the Savior in helping us to have empathy and love for our brothers and sisters. Merry Christmas!

Wally West
SLC, UT

at John Charity Spring 1:32 p.m. Dec. 23

"We need the influence of the true spirit of Christmas more than ever. In fact, nothing is needed more in these dark times."

Proof that the *perception is reality* mindset is a load of hokum.

"The majority of good citizens must rise up against the leftist and demand the right to celebrate the true spirit of Christmas."

What exactly is that pray tell? Is it the co-opted Pagan tradition of Saturnalia?

Or, do you mean crass consumerism that this holiday has devolved into? BTW, Timothy Hutton's character on Leverage recently went off on this very topic.

Screwdriver
Casa Grande, AZ

Nice paranoia JCS. Take some responsibility, if god is in your heart and your childrens then he is plenty in the schools and everywhere else.

Along the lines of psychology, anyone that actually knows Bro Parker should encourage him to seek counseling. There are plenty of LDS counselors the church can recommend but very often I hear of people just relying on their faith to get them through without the counseling. I learned the hard way myself. Church leaders are not necessarily trained in counseling. One "leader" actually thought I was lucky to get to go out dating again, slapped me on the back and everything.

Knowing the 5 stages of grief was an incredible relief I could have used much sooner. I realized what I felt was completely normal though not the ideal stoic response of a statue. It's easy to get stuck in the anger/guilt stages and confuse the shock stage for incredible strength and forgiveness. I'm not an expert, but I have more respect for the experts now.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Unlike some folks, Robbie Parker is a real class act. He is a man to be admired and emulated by all of us.

estreetshuffle
Window Rock, AZ

By experience, it is hard. But it can be done. The wounds are deep (after two years bereaved by other's actions) but it can be done. Forgive.

kargirl
Sacramento, CA

Robbie Parker, the other people cited, and many more are examples of those whose first act, possibly even without a thought behind it, is to do what the Savior would do. With Jesus in their soul of souls, they have had forgiveness not only on their tongues but in their hearts. That was the best eulogy that could have been spoken in their memory. May there be some healing with these words of Brother Parker, for all concerned.

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