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Comments about ‘Dutchman launches life-sized replica of Noah's Ark’

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Published: Tuesday, Dec. 11 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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Blue
Salt Lake City, UT

Jeff,

Sure, flood mythologies extend beyond the Bible. That's the whole point. The tale of Noah's flood is a re-hash of the ancient Greek story of Deucalion. It predates the tale of Noah, describes it nearly identically - it just has Zeus committing mass murder.

"World literature" is not where geologists and zoologists go to understand the fictional nature of Noah's flood. Evidence for a global flood of 6,000 or so years ago would be found in rock strata, sea beds, and the types and diversification, both genetically and geographically, of species. Such real-world evidence simply does not exist.

Go talk to any member of the BYU's geology faculty and ask them if they've found physical evidence of a global flood.

Go talk to any member of BYU's zoology faculty and ask them if what we know of life on Earth today in any way remotely supports the idea of a global flood 6,000 years ago.

My reasoning is not circular. Noah's flood is a myth because there is zero evidence for it being anything other than a myth.

A religious fable? Fine - it's your religion, have fun.

But it's not real.

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

If we view death as only a stepping stone along our eternal path and growing up in an evil world would facilitate problems that could ruin our eternal futures, then death would be preferable option even for the very young.

God then would not be cruel for cleansing the earth, but kind. Note that only God could make such judgments of entire populations.

Jeff
Temple City, CA

@ Mukkake: As with all metaphors, there are problems when you want to go too far.

The truth about God is that He is kind and benevolent. He is perfectly just and perfectly merciful. He loves all of us.

I do not write the above as a statement of faith or wishful thinking, but as a statement of fact, one that I know from personal experience (I confess, I extrapolate from my experience: ie, God loves me and everyone I know, therefore God loves all His children) and from frequent personal contact with Him. There is no dispute or argument of this point. For that reason, I would submit that you are simply wrong in your characterization of God's motives in the flood.

There are any number of possible approaches to the Bible--literalism being one of them. Your rhetorical question suggesting that that is the only possible approach suggests a certain closed-mindedness on your part, which fits the nature of your attempt to characterize God as something bad.

It reminds me of a frequent argument I hear from atheist friends of mine: "I don't believe in God because I don't like Him." Illogical and contradictory.

Mukkake
Salt Lake City, UT

Jeff:
[There is no dispute or argument of this point. For that reason, I would submit that you are simply wrong in your characterization of God's motives in the flood.]

But I can, and do, reject the validity/interpretation of your experience (just as any religious person rejects the validity/interpretation of contradictory religious experiences). That's the problem with subjective "evidence", we can dismiss it without further argument. In this day and age, physical evidence is taken more seriously than witness testimonies.

My characterizations were all hypothetical, as I take the Bible literally, but not seriously.

[There are any number of possible approaches to the Bible--literalism being one of them.]

It's the only practical approach for discussion, otherwise we would have to go line by line and have you tell me what your opinion on every book, chapter, verse, sentence, and word is.

[Your rhetorical question suggesting that that is the only possible approach suggests a certain closed-mindedness on your part,]

I generally find discussions of "closed/open-mindedness" pointless. It generally means that you don't think I've given enough time to your argument. Granted; I value my time.

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