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Comments about ‘Letter: In the coins vs. bills debate, bills will’

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Published: Tuesday, Dec. 11 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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Lonster
Sandy, UT

I agree with Mr. Newman. And besides having a ton of coins weighing you down and tearing through your pockets, people for some obscure reason like to squirrell these pretty (what Mr. Newman descriptively calls painted) dollar coins away --- the only time I see them is when I get change at the car wash change machine.

When Hostess was still a going concern I'd often pay for my thrift store purchases with "gold"dollars and the clerk would get wide-eyed and take bills from her purse to exchange for the coins. Strange...

one old man
Ogden, UT

All those coins jangling around in my pocket would make it hard to run. If I ever fall in a deep puddle, they'd pull me down and drown me. The noise they make would mean it would be difficult to sneak up on someone. Lots of down sides to them.

In the few experiences I've had with them so far, EVERY time I've tried to use one, the store clerk has mistaken them for quarters.

But in the end, I guess they'll be like almost every other change (sorry about that pun) in our lives. We'll get used to them if we must.

Mike in Sandy
Sandy, UT

I completely disagree.
My wife's family is Canadian, and their $1 and $2 coins are fantastic.
We travel there frequently.
They outlast a printed bill by miles, saving us lots of money in production.
They aren't huge---not a lot bigger than a quarter, and smaller than the old Kennedy half dollar.
Perhaps the better idea is to stop producing pennies, and round off all pricing to the nearest nickel.
Paper bills, especially ones, get worn out quickly and are getting to be impractical to print.

chilly
Salt Lake City, UT

This definitely falls in the category of "first world problems" as discussed in Doug Robinson's column today.

"My steady job is so boring."
"Botox or laser -- which is right for me?"
"There are so many channels -- how am I supposed to find anything?"

Steve Cottrell
Centerville, UT

This is a simple example of how we resist any change that might reduce the cost of government. According to previous articles, it would save billions. Is this not exactly what we want our Washington government to do? As E. Dirksen was credited with saying, "a billion here and a billion there and pretty soon you're talking about real money."

Lane Myer
Salt Lake City, UT

Canadians just quit making the dollar bills. $1 and $2 coins are the way to go. Make the change and don't print any more ones. Come on congress...do it!

SteveD
North Salt Lake, UT

A dollar is now wortyh less than a quarter was, when I was a kid. We managed then and we will now. And, definately, get rid of pennies.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

The coins will prevail. The economics of coins versus bills alone will sort that out. I, too, am a dual citizen who not only survives but appreciates the canadian loonie and twonie. And the larger deonomination canadian bills are all now or soon will be polymer instead of paper, lasting much longer. In any event, I hardly ever return from canada with change because debit is so ubiquitous. Here, too, cash of any kind will become less prominent as time goes on.

Screwdriver
Casa Grande, AZ

Spain had dollar coins 30 years ago. They are great, and save the country money since they last decades in stead of 1 year like paper.

I already get our 1 dollar coins from vending machines. I like them. In Spain everybody just had a little leather pocket pouch for coins. Coins worked for thousands of years - we can go back to it.

Eric Samuelsen
Provo, UT

In addition to being a first-world problem, it's also a geezer problem. As a geezer, I'm allowed to say that. My kids never use money. Everything's debit card, every purchase. I'm the old guy with the five dollar bill and the pocked jangling with change.

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