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Comments about ‘My view: Police must follow their own protocols’

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Published: Friday, Nov. 30 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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VIDAR
Murray, UT

John Adams 64 years old Lebanon, Tennessee: Shot to death during a SWAT drug raid while watching TV. The house didn’t match the description on the warrant.

The war on drugs is a war on our own people:

Ismael Mena 45 years old Denver, Colorado: Mena was killed when police barged into his house looking for drugs. They had the wrong address.

Mario Paz 65 years old Compton, California: Mario was shot twice in the back in his bedroom during a SWAT raid looking for marijuana. No drugs were found.

Alberta Spruill 57 years old Harlem, New York: Police, acting on a tip, forced their way into Spruill’s home, setting off flash grenades. She suffered a heart attack and died. It was the wrong address

Accelyne Williams 75 years old Boston, Massachusetts: Accelyne was a retired Methodist Minister and substance abuse counselor. After an informant gave police a bad address, a SWAT raid was conducted on the minster’s home. The door was battered down, Williams was tackled to the floor and his hands tied behind his back. He died of a heart attack.

How much collateral damage is too much?

Impartial7
DRAPER, UT

Protocol wasn't followed? Sounds like breaking the laws that control them. Utah cops want to play Navy Seal with citizens that don't fight back like terrorists. Ive lived in many States where most law enforcement acts professionally & is respected by law abidding citizens. In Utah, both the cops & the AG act like they are above the law & deserve the disdain they receive from the population.

Flashback
Kearns, UT

I used to be a cop and I normally support them. The problem is now days, there isn't enough screening and many of the cops are badge heavy. They think just because they put on the badge that their opinion is the only one that counts. That attitude results in shoddy investigations and junk like this happening.

I witnessed an incident at a little league football game this fall where a referee wanted an unruly fan removed. After the cop, who was being paid by Ute Conference to provide security, went and talked to the unruly fan, he then went and gave the third degree to the official, threatening the official with removal from the premises. When I heard that exchange, I almost went over to the cop to tell him he was totally out of line. The cop had no business trying to intimidate that official. When I talked to the ref about it, he was appropriately steamed. He told me that the cop accused him of threatening the fan. I heard what the ref said to the fan and the cop was wrong.

Until attitudes change, cops will continue to be held in low esteem, sadly.

airnaut
Everett, 00

Is that like when police uses tazer shots to subdue an obviously unarmed naked man in front of his wife and child on the side of the road out in the middle of the desert?

Only to have him die because he couldn't/wouldn't stay laying flat on the ground face-first because of the exghutiating pain and also being in full cardiac arrest?

Rather than being simply hand-cuffed is repeatedly tazed and re-tazed until he is unresponsive --
THAT kind of protocol?

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