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Comments about ‘Letter: Locking up Utah lands and prohibiting their responsible use does not make sense’

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Published: Wednesday, Nov. 28 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "Let's be realistic . . . ."

No such thing amongst the tiny cabal of radical greenies that will surely post their snarky comments suggesting it IS realistic to turn the entire Intermountain West into an off-limits petting zoo for their back-East and Left-coast overlords.

A rigidly enforced leftist orthodoxy has produced a great dearth of realistic thinking among liberals, academics, and assorted other "progressives."

And, its killing America.

Emajor
Ogden, UT

The problem, Mr. South, is that there are many contrary opinions as to what "responsible" use entails. Figure out how to resolve that definition amongst everyone and you may be eligible for a Nobel Prize.

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

What is responsible use?

What might seem "responsible" today might actually result in polluted water, destroyed lands, dirty air, etc tomorrow. In other words, completely irresponsible use of the land.

I mean, just look, in the 50s many folks considered experimenting on desert lands in Nevada using the A-bomb as "responsible." Ask down winders in St. George how that worked out for them.

Lets get off big oil and get working to more progressive and environmentally safe solutions.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Nothing is prohibiting responsible use.

Demo Dave
Holladay, UT

The letter writer doesn't get it. The earth does not exist for our unlimited, insatiable consumption. Also, there is no such thing as multiple use; just multiple ways to destroy pristine landscapes. Similarly, responsible energy extraction is a misnomer because damage to world-class landscapes is permanent and irreversible, and only erodes the boundaries between nature and civilization to where they become indistinguishable. We don't need more oil. We need to use less of it. We dodged a bullet when Romney lost the election because repairing the econmomy at the expense of the natural world would have been too high a price to pay. With the climate events we are witnessing, we are already paying a premium for our past and present greed and ignorance. Don't we ever learn?

Sensible Scientist
Rexburg, ID

The impacts of most energy extraction (except open-pit mining) are in fact temporary and reversible. If that were not true, no one could live in much of Los Angeles and there would not be orchards and vineyards in large parts of California's central valley.

We do in fact need more oil. It's what fuels the economies of the world right now, and the world is growing. We are, in fact, using less of it (per use) as technologies increase efficiency.

Oil and gas production has less impact on the land than building a house. There is no substantiated tie between the "climate events we are witnessing" and CO2.

Yes, we do learn, at least when we're educated.

Corn Dog
New York, NY

@Demo Dave

The earth does not exist for a small group of elitists with lots of free time to enjoy "pristine landscapes", whatever that is. The earth must provide seven going on ten billion people with food, water, shelter, and energy. If "pristine landscapes" must be sacrificed to do that, so be it.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

Corn Dog
New York, NY said: The earth does not exist for a small group of elitists with lots of free time to enjoy "pristine landscapes", whatever that is. The earth must provide seven going on ten billion people with food, water, shelter, and energy. If "pristine landscapes" must be sacrificed to do that, so be it.

So a guy who lives in one of the most densely populated area in the US says "pristine landscapes", whatever that is."
come on out west and I'll show you.

You also say: If "pristine landscapes" must be sacrificed to do that, so be it." New York is NOT what the people of Utah think we should aspire to, but hey enjoy you pristine city.

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