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Comments about ‘In our opinion: Raising the food tax to 4.75 percent is the wrong solution’

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Published: Tuesday, Nov. 20 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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stevo123
slc, ut

When Ward Roylance (Utah taxpayers association), and Seanator John Valentine agree on a tax increase you know the poor and lower middle class will get clobbered.

IJ
Hyrum, Ut

Food should not be taxed!(maybe junk foods) Medicine and medical treatment should not be taxed. Property should not be taxed. There should never be a taxes that allows the government to steal peoples lives. Remember, people are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, ... Do not tax those things that threaten life. Tax other things if you must, but not those life sustaining elements of society!

Gildas
LOGAN, UT

Taxing necessities is an inequity; cut them down to zero never mind 1.75% or any percent.

Tax luxuries for all, at a rate under ten percent, and cut back on government spending. Most of these local taxes are for education; there is a ton of flab in the education system: top heavy administration and extraneous courses, sports programs and the like. It is a crying shame to see young families who cannot even get into these public schools without paying hundreds of doallars in fees every year in addition to heavy sales and property taxes.

As for welfare - make it workfare; the people want it when they have been asked I believe, but governments do not deliver the product.

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

The repubs in this state would tax the air the poor breathe if they thought they could get away with it.

Bebyebe
UUU, UT

I used to care about people, families. Then I came to Utah. "If you don't like it you can leave" is the motto of the local culture. I'm now feel about them as they feel about me.

This tax makes large Mormon families start to pay their fair share. 'Doesn't affect me much at all. I say 'bring it on'.

Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

People that are working, but struggling to have enough money to pay bills often target a mortgage/rent, utilities, transportation and then food.

When someone walks into a store with $3 left to buy food, you don't tell them it is OK they don't have enough money to buy milk or chicken, they will get $80 at the end of the year.

Raising the tax on food increases the number of people needing help from the community, church or government and is the wrong thing to do.

The majority republicans and democrats in the state house correctly fought the idea of raising the price on food 2 years ago, despite it passing in the senate. That bill was to lower the overall rate to make up for the food tax matching everything else. While that idea was terrible in a recession and especially hard on fixed income, it isn't as bad as the idea being tossed on in the senate this year. I respect the sponsor, but not the bill.

Even today, there are people that don't have enough money to buy food, but are managing to stay off the food stamps and other helps, but just barely.

Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

The comment about the 30% sales tax growth to transportation was not accurate. That law has a cap to limit it to approx. the amount of sales on transportation related items.

dave4197
Redding, CA

Raising the sales tax on groceries, even collecting any tax on groceries is an idea whose time has long gone. Except in Repubican caucuses that have no compassion like in Utah. Why do Utah voters elect these creeps who want to regressively tax the poor? Why do Utah voters elect these creeps who cannot see a way out for their need to spend? Surely conservatives like the Utah Republicans can find a way to reduce spending for those pet projects for which they want to regressively raise taxes on the basic food needs for the poorest among us!! C'mon, repubs, recognize my thesis - this is an idea whose time has long gone in other states and localities around the US, your basic ideas needed to change a decade ago.

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