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Published: Monday, Nov. 19 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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one old man
Ogden, UT

The gunk will not clear out until our "leaders" decide it will. I remember the foul air (and water) of Pittsburgh, and Cleveland and Youngstown, Ohio back in the '50s. The Clean Air Act (and Clean Water Act) and enforcement thereof cleaned the gunk. It was not Mother Nature.

We need "leaders" with some backbone. Instead we have "leaders" who want to kill EPA and cut enforcement of both CAA and CWA.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Here in utah we know man can't modify the climate. So we don't have to try anything to fix it.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "The gunk will not clear out until Mother Nature decides it will."

So, why all the fuss?

Those of us that have been here longer than the last couple real estate cycles remember, and even have a certain nostalgia for those days when Utah air actually WAS dirty -- gray snow, burning eyes and throat, particularly near foundries and smelters, smell of burning wood and coal most of the winter.

Yet we worked, played, and traveled outside and enjoyed life inside, without benefit of HEPA and other expensive filters. And, we've all survived in pretty good shape, at least considering our age.

All the current hand-wringing and bed-wetting over what honest activists would have to admit is pretty clean air, should be seen as nothing more than the political gamesmanship it really is.

Liberals feel a curious need to disingenuously generate crises that they can swoop down and save us from by legislating or regulating away our liberties.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Procurawhatever just proved that he wants to take us all back to the stone age when he wrote: "Those of us that have been here longer than the last couple real estate cycles remember, and even have a certain nostalgia for those days when Utah air actually WAS dirty -- gray snow, burning eyes and throat, particularly near foundries and smelters, smell of burning wood and coal most of the winter."

I have an idea. Why not just set close all your doors and windows and then set your kitchen trash can on fire? The result would be that you could take your nostalgic trip back in time without affecting the rest of us.

And since you don't believe in taxpayer funded services, please don't call the fire department if your blaze gets away from you.

Yeah but
South Jordan, UT

The diatribe between the old man and the procurador demonstrates that neither is listening to what the other is saying. The old man says that he remembers back in the 50's when places he grew up had bad air and water, and now, thanks solely to the Clean Air Act, etc., the air there is pristine. Procurador is basically saying the same thing - the air here in this valley is cleaner today than it has been since the native tribes first started over-wintering here. And yet, Don Quixote still seeks windmills at which to tilt; hence, we find the wives of rich men who want to stay busy and save the world, and latch onto whatever "cause de jour" they find, and give it their all, regardless of what they can actually contribute. Regardless, old man, meteorology in this valley does hold most of the cards, and the growing population and numbers of miles driven quickly overcome anything the feds or the state is able to do. So, old man, when the next inversion settles in to stay, if you want to quit breathing this "dirty air," you have two choices - leave or quit breathing.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Yeah but, you're right. Up to a point.

I realize that geography work against clean air here. But I was trying to point out how ridiculous Procura's arguments were. And was also trying to point out that gutting the clean air and water laws as some propose will lead to disaster.

But the part of your post that points to growing population and its problems only proves what I keep saying. The world would be a much better place without all those PEOPLE in it!

Maybe what we need to do is look for good solutions instead of fighting with one another.

Keep smiling and have a great day.

Demo Dave
Holladay, UT

These are all worthy ideas, but they don't address the main cause of air pollution -- automobiles. And no matter what the author says or does, the air inside our homes is usually worse than the air outside. This is due to the adhesives and oil-based compounds found in carpet, linoleum, countertops, appliances and paint.

Our air will only get better when people start driving less, drive smaller cars, use mass transit, ride bikes and walk more, and really think about their priorities and how our selfishness can harm everyone.

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