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Comments about ‘John Florez: Involve the poor in fighting poverty’

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Published: Saturday, Nov. 10 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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one old man
Ogden, UT

There is probably some real wisdom here.

What say we give it a good try?

one old man
Ogden, UT

Ooops . . . wrong button too soon.

But this will take some community organization and that means community organizers.

Isn't that something bad to the minds of some people?

Mike Richards
South Jordan, Utah

I agree completely with Mr. Florez. The key factor in ending poverty is jobs. Hiring the poor to work at jobs that help the poor is an excellent way of lifting the poor out of poverty.

John Charity Spring
Back Home in Davis County, UT

Once again Florez refuses to hold people accountable for their actions. He epitomizes the left-wing dogma of placing blame on society, rather than on the individual where it belongs.

Flores is really after more handouts for those who refuse to provide for themselves. His proposal is no different than putting the fox in charge of the hen house. Letting welfare recipients to determine the circumstances under which they are entitled to welfare is absurdity at its worst.

The Founding Fathers believed that a man must work for his bread, and if he would not work, he would not eat. Florez would pass out bread to everyone, with no work expected in return. Under his theory, bread will magically appear, even though everyone is too lazy to make and bake it.

Wonder
Provo, UT

Mike Richards, for once I agree with you. You are right that the way to lift the poor out of poverty is to get them working. If this idea does that, then it could be a great idea. In my experience working with the poor as a volunteer, the issue for poor people usually isn't a lack of desire to work. It's complicating factors like finding child care that doesn't eat up all of your pay check, finding housing that doesn't eat up all of your pay check, finding transportation to your job when you can't afford a car and public transportation is sporadic and/or unreliable, etc. These are issues that need to be addressed somehow in the quest to get the poor out of a cycle of poverty. I always thought there was plenty of government help for these things, but my eyes have been opened in the past few years. Unless you have family to help, it's pretty tough.

J Thompson
SPRINGVILLE, UT

The government workers have no incentive to fix the poverty problem. If they fix the problem, they're out of a job. Those who live in poverty have every incentive to fix the problem for themselves and for everyone around them. They want to stop being poor. They want their friends and family to stop being poor. Their incentive is to stop being poor.

Everyone who has a job has that same incentive. They don't want to be poor. They don't want creditors breathing down their necks.

John Florez is telling us that letting the poor work along side the government employee, who is "helping the poor", might be a good way to get the job done.

What the government has done for 80 years has not worked. Trying John's plan couldn't be any worse than continuing with FDR's and LBJ's and Obama's failed ideas.

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

So . . .

Other than John Charity Spring we are all in agreement that this is the sort of thing we should try?

Stop the presses. Put this on the front page of the Deseret News . . .

Soul
Salt Lake City, UT

"Wrong Timing" is often a huge contributor to perpetuating poverty in America. For example, when it is time to help one's self and prepare for the future by diligently studying in school (gain the basic knowledge and skills to become meaningfully employed in the near future), you sluff classes daily for whatever reasons. The result is the same, poverty is maintained. For an increasing number of youths, when they are still children they insure their poverty status by becoming pregnant for whatever reason. The result is the same, poverty is maintained into the next generation. When government is supposed to help break the cycle of hopelessness, they cut funding for a better public education. Maintaining service agencies becomes their primary strategy against poverty, regardless of the human costs. When there are able bodied workers to be employed, then there are no jobs available. In my view, helping at the wrong time does perpetuated poverty.

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