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Comments about ‘Letter: New West Jordan library has discriminatory parking hybrid and low-emission vehicles only’

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Published: Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012 12:00 a.m. MST

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Curmudgeon
Salt Lake City, UT

I love being able to park my Prius free on Salt Lake City streets. Discriminatory? Perhaps. But that's just one example among many of government policy being used to promote a public good. How about tax credits for installing solar panels or attic insulation? I suppose the author is against those too.

one old man
Ogden, UT

But stop to think -- those drivers will not be in as good physical shape as you will be after you get some exercise walking a few feet further.

CHS 85
Sandy, UT

This is just like my wife's Kindergarten class. "He butted me."

Steve C. Warren
WEST VALLEY CITY, UT

"All Utahns should enjoy equal access to the structures our taxes helped to build."

There goes the governor's parking spot.

VIDAR
Murray, UT

what about the high occupance lanes? They were meant to encourage carpooling. Now the wealthy can drive in them by paying a fee. Unless the wealthy want to buy the land; and pay to build their own car lanes; this should not be allowed

Grover
Salt Lake City, UT

Robert: "Sale of hybrid cars peaked in 2008." Here is a great example of a half truth. The statement is true as stated (I am willing to accept that you told the truth), but the problem comes with your conclusion. You seem to say that the decline in sales is due to the public wising up and therefore proving that we don't need parking spots for hybrid/natural gas cars.

Isn't it just as likely that 2008 was famous for more than the end of the hybrid boom...like the melt down of the world as we know it? Isn't that just as likely or more likely to have caused the drop in sales. Hybrids are more expensive and household budgets have tightened since then. Yes?

Wally West
SLC, UT

Can you say Social Engineering?

SG in SLC
Salt Lake City, UT

@Wally West
"Can you say Social Engineering?"

And that's a problem because . . . ??

Social engineering happens all the time, and often for much more nefarious things than encouraging/rewarding "green" automobile choices.

Wally West
SLC, UT

@ SG in SLC

Do I really need to point out why its a problem? Do their need to be Sheep as well as a Beehive on Utah's state flag!?

mark
Salt Lake City, UT

Oh my gosh. Really? You're worried about walking a few more feet?

Wally West
SLC, UT

re: SG in SLC

Do I really need to spell out Why? REALLY!?

Corn Dog
New York, NY

Government can promote (via the bully pulpit) preferable behaviors without engaging in blatant discrimination. Such discrimination breeds contempt for government.

As far as environmental impacts go, how you drive is more important than what you drive. Do you restrict your driving to necessities (buying food, commuting to work), or do you waste energy and generate pollution driving your Prius hundreds of miles to go skiing or mountain biking? Do you drive your Prius 25 miles on a single purpose errand to the newsstand just to buy the latest issue of the Sierra Club magazine? Do you chain trips, using your Humvee's large cargo capacity to carry a week's worth of laundry to the laundromat, purchase a week's worth of groceries, and a do-it-yourself solar panel installation kit, all in one trip? You'd need multiple daily trips to do that with an eco-car.

ugottabkidn
Sandy, UT

Parking Lot too big? Keep taking all the shortcuts you can get and soon you'll be able to get one of those handicap spots.

SG in SLC
Salt Lake City, UT

Yes, Wally, you really DO need to point out why it is a problem; but first, let me point some things out:

I really was serious when I said that social engineering happens all the time -- we just call it different things, such as marketing, incentivizing, "sweetening the deal", etc. When it comes right down to it, though, it's simply pavlovian operant conditioning. We are really "homo sapiens economicus" (economic man), and we are all about maximizing real or perceived utility and value received. Businesses and governments know this, and consequently use incentives and disincentives to great effect.

I was also serious about social engineering being used for a wide array of things, from the benign (e.g., tax code incentives for home ownership and charitable giving), to the insidious (e.g., desensitizing the public to escalating gratuitous sex and violence in the media, stigmatizing the connotations of words to further covert social agendas).

So, I stand by my statement that rewarding the use of hybrid vehicles is really pretty benign; of course, if you have an ax to grind against conservationism or activist government, you are going to see this differently . . .

mark
Salt Lake City, UT

Wally west, do you need to spell it out? Yes. Really.

Corn dog, Prius v Hummer for economy and enviromental impact, your argument is about the silliest thing I have ever heard. I would imagine that large cargo area in the back of your HumVee is empty except for that one theoretical day when you pick up groceries and do laundry and pick up solar panels. Other then that I bet you most of the time there is no load and only one person in that vehicle getting - what - 8 mpg. Versus 50 mpg for that Prius. That's a lotta trips. Oh, and there is plenty of room for groceries, and laundry, in that hatchback.

And before you cite that CNW Marketing Reserch study, don't - it has been thoroughly discredited.

SG in SLC
Salt Lake City, UT

@Corn Dog

Clearly, the Prius is not the only hybrid option available. A GMC Yukon Hybrid could easily be substituted for your hypothetical Hummvee at about twice the fuel efficiency and about 2/3 the cost.

Your point about optimizing the logistics of how we drive is well taken, though. Generally speaking, most of us need to do a better job of that.

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