Comments about ‘Church-going teens graduate and attend college more, BYU-Rice study shows’

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Published: Saturday, Nov. 3 2012 9:00 p.m. MDT

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Hutterite
American Fork, UT

If you're mormon, you're more likely to stick to the prescribed game plan. That's what you're expected to do.

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

Re: Hutterite American Fork, UT
"If you're mormon, you're more likely to stick to the prescribed game plan."

If you're a Mormon you're more likely to come from a traditional two-parent family where the teach by example and give their children an extra advantage over those who don't.

mightymite
DRAPER, UT

I'd like to see all the facts that this story is supposed to be based on. In addition Rifleman can you provide you fact of "more likely" because of the advantages of mormonism? Just crazy..

Ironhide
Salt Lake City, UT

Shhhhhhh. This is way too public a forum to speak of religion. If you believe in religion keep your head down and mouth shut. We're not supposed to speak about religion, ever. Let alone that it has any real benefits. Benefits?? This research is bogus. Made up. Nothing good comes from religion. People who believe in religion are brainwashed with fairytales. They can't think for themselves. They're drones. It's all made up. Everything is made up. People who believe in religion use it to wish away their problems and bad times and place it on some mystical force because they are inherently weak and can't deal with it in a logical manner. Logic and reason answer everything. They don't even know what reality is. Why would they want to go to and complete college? It's all made up.

Or the research is real and you just need to deal.

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

correlation does not always equal causation.

DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

The route to a successful life is well known, and not dependent on some expensive government programs.

Intact two parent families, with a religious foundation.
Graduate from high school. Get married prior to having children.

Anything else is a proven short cut to disaster, dependency or worse.

Choices. There are rewards for good ones, and consequences for bad ones.

Congratulations to those who make good choices, but I have little sympathy for those who voluntarily make bad ones.

TimBehrend
Auckland NZ, 00

One factor that one would expect to play a key role in a study like this is the correlation between level of parental education and children's educational choices/achievements. It's hard to imagine that the research didn't take it into consideration. Ms Morgan should have commented on that aspect of the research findings.

Dr S
Purcellville, VA

These results are not surprising given that the two top ranking religions both encourage and expect educational attainment. Simply reinforcing the idea that it is each individual's responsibility to obtain as much education as possible on a regular basis puts members of these two religions at a distinct advantage.

Since the research in child development has clearly shown that the two factors that are most important in raising competent children are high expectations and high positive regard, these two churches have excelled in providing ways to provide exactly what is needed to maximize their children's chances of success as adults.

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

Mightmite. Read the article, it answers all your concerns about the facts you doubt.

thunder struck
Salt Lake City, UT

@JoeBlow - this article does not argue causation. Clearly it is correlation, but there is still some causation if you think about how intertwined it is.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@DN Subscriber

"The route to a successful life is well known, and not dependent on some expensive government programs.

Intact two parent families, with a religious foundation.
Graduate from high school. Get married prior to having children.

Anything else is a proven short cut to disaster, dependency or worse."

None of these things will absolutely break or make anybody. I know plenty of people from strong families with a religious foundation that fell far from the ship. I know others (such as my fiance) who come from a broken, minority family with high crime, lack of parents, drugs, etc. who is a godsend and has a master's degree. A high school diploma is nothing today. You need college and a heck of a worth ethic to compete in today's market.

I'd like to hear your explanation for not having a religious foundation leading to disaster, dependency, or worse? Can you back that up?

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

Re: mightymite DRAPER, UT
"I'd like to see all the facts that this story is supposed to be based on."

You'll find what you seek in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. It makes sense that people who have both feet on the ground and and have self-respect for themselves are going to be more successful when achieving goals.

Teens who live a morally clean life stand out because the take to more difficult road that is less traveled.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

"It makes sense that people who have both feet on the ground and and have self-respect for themselves are going to be more successful when achieving goals."

Attainable without religion.

"Teens who live a morally clean life stand out because the take to more difficult road that is less traveled."

Attainable without religion. And that road is not more difficult and less traveled when you only surround yourself with people doing the same. It becomes the easy road. The hard road for all my Mormon friends is doing what you consider the easy road, such as premarital sex, partying, and other teen/youth activities.

LDSareChristians
Anchorage, AK

@LValfre"
It makes sense that people who have both feet on the ground and and have self-respect for themselves are going to be more successful when achieving goals."

Attainable without religion.
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More or less likely is the key word. You can do it without religion. But are more likely to be successful with religion.

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