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Comments about ‘John W. Welch: Trust and accountability still heart of U.S. politics’

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Published: Tuesday, Oct. 23 2012 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Owen
Heber City, UT

Amen. Politics is played and won by gaming ethics. Candidates are allowed to mislead to gain advantage. R.L. Stevenson said: "To tell the truth is not just to state facts, but leave a true impression." Imagine what could have been if the candidate who shares my religion would have broken the mold, upheld his beliefs and played politics according to personal ethics he would have had my trust and vote. Instead his prevarications and shifting have earned him a reputation that will stick throughout his life despite the outcome of the election.

WHAT NOW?
Saint George, UT

@Owen

Well said.

Thank you.

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

The Obama campaign has failed in two ways:
#1: It has failed miserably to disqualify Mitt Romney as our future president inspite of a landslide of personal attacks.
#2: It has failed miserably to qualify Obama as president.This is because Obama can't run on his record and have not succeeded in re-inventing his record,the imaginary recovery.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Trust and accountability are the heart of U.S. politics?

When does anyone plan to start on that?

Kent C. DeForrest
Provo, UT

As long as the American people are willing to believe lies, misrepresentations, simplistic solutions to complex problems, and character attacks, we will get what we deserve.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "Trust and accountability still heart of U.S. politics"

Since when?

President Obama is just the latest in a long line of empty suits to step forward, promise America "hope and change," and, after securing our trust, blithely trot through a term, breaking that promise in every conceivable way, then, only at the end, disingenuously don a serious face long enough to look some camera in the eye and suggest anyone who doesn't believe him is on the wrong side of history.

In this, they're often abetted by a fawning, self-interested media, that's plenty short on trust and accountability itself.

At the end of the day, however, mistrust and unaccountability are -- rightly -- far more frequent companions of politicians than trust and accountability.

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