Comments about ‘Visitation critical for inmates during, after incarceration’

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Published: Saturday, Oct. 20 2012 1:00 p.m. MDT

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terra nova
Park City, UT

Matthew 25 puts it simply and gracefully:

35 For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in:

36 Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I WAS IN PRISON and YE CAME UNTO ME.

37 Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungred, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink?

38 When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in? or naked, and clothed thee?

39 Or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee?

40 And the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, INASMUCH AS YE HAVE DONE IT UNTO ONE OF THE LEAST OF MY BRETHREN, YE HAVE DONE IT UNTO ME.

John Jackson
Sandy, UT

DesNews, you pick up a topic for which society has more room for improvement than it does with many of our other social issues, one that is being somewhat overlooked. Too often, prisons are primarily geared for punishment, not rehabilitation.

Terra Nova quotes a good scripture, but could also have quoted from Luke 15, where the shepherd leaves the ninety and nine and goes after the lost sheep. Perhaps, we should be more intent on restoring the lost to the fold of society.

Perhaps, then, instead of ignoring and shunning these people, we should be reaching out to them like we reach out to none other. (I know there might be a degree of hypocrisy in my words, for I have never once visited the Draper prison.)

We've all heard of the studies of how babies develop better when they are nurtured and loved. Do we suppose such a principle doesn't apply to adults? If love is the most important ingredient for changing lives -- and it is -- then if we are serious about rehabilitating these people, we must offer them love. Love the prisoner, or face him again.

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