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Comments about ‘CNN Belief Blog: 'I'm spiritual but not religious' is a cop-out’

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Published: Monday, Oct. 15 2012 3:00 p.m. MDT

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Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Suggesting the assertion that 'spiritual but not religious' is one of the most retrogressive aspects in contemporary society is a bit too much in the hubris department. On the contrary, I believe it is positive. It's great that people are spiritual; it suggests a personal relationship with god, as they see god to be. Religion is just the veneer of ceremony and group think that detract from that relationship, and serve to divide us into groups apart from one another.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

"It seems that just being a part of a religious institution is nowadays associated negatively, with everything from the Religious Right to child abuse, back to the Crusades and of course with terrorism today."

Let's not forget racism and homophobia that perpetuates (or perpetuated) some religious institutes. As knowledge and education increases in Western societies .... secularism is taking hold.

non believer
PARK CITY, UT

Isn't being spiritual the goal of all religions? Teach your members to be good spiritual people and do good in life...... Why should it be any more complicated than that? If you are required to sit in a church every sunday in order to be saved, then you should look elsewhere because you are being taught false doctorin! I will take spirituality over religion any day!

Craig Clark
Boulder, CO

There are many today who have no problem believing in God but who have a real problem with institutional religion. I take strong exception to the article when Alan Miller writes, "Being spiritual but not religious avoids having to think too hard about having to decide,"

Really? Doesn"t spirituality precede religion? Miller's words in the extreme disqualify from consideration the thought of Moses, Jesus, Paul, Augustine, Francis of Assisi, Aquinas, Joseph Smith, and many others who came along with something effusive to breathe new life into old remains. The spiritual can flourish without religion but religion without the spiritual is a lamp without a flame.

"That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the spirit is spirit."
- John 3:6

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

Cant one have a profound belief in a higher being and not attend a church?

Isn't religion man made?

There are lots of religions and either one or none have it right.

They all profess to have the truth.

They all have their differences, but somehow manage to weave power, money and control into their dogma.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

Organized religion inhibits true spirituality. Turning your minds over to someone else, letting them think for you, precludes your own spiritual growth.

Organized religion has devolved into a money making enterprise. Christ threw the money changers out of the temple but they've managed to worm their way back in and they've taken over.

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: Craig Clark, Doesn"t (True) spirituality precede religion, "That which is born of the* flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the *spirit is spirit."- John 3:6.
Verse 7 “ Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again”.(anothen born from above)God must regenerate ones heart.

*This passage contradicts the concept of a flesh and bone Heavenly Mother who gives birth to heavenly spirit babies.

LValfre
CHICAGO, IL

@sharrona

"*This passage contradicts the concept of a flesh and bone Heavenly Mother who gives birth to heavenly spirit babies."

So what's right then? The Bible or the LDS concept?

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

I'm not sure what the problem is with someone being spiritual but not believing any church/religion around is the "true" church/religion. A young Joseph Smith would've fallen in this category.

raybies
Layton, UT

I think the author's intent is to point out the tendency we have to rationalize our spiritual laziness. In that respect he's got a point. Spirituality without any form of sacrifice or willingness to stand up with others who believe likewise is a cop-out. It really is meaningless and phony, because when really pressed, there's nothing to it, and whatever's convenient next week will likely supplant whatever spiritual compunctions that occurred the week prior.

That said, people should be free to associate their religious beliefs (that they hold and defend) regardless of formal affiliation with an organized religion, as long as they do not impinge upon the basic rights of others. People should be free to believe what they believe and live by them.

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