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80% have religious affiliation, but rise in 'nones' impacts politics

Published: Tuesday, Oct. 9 2012 12:27 a.m. MDT

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Say No to BO
Mapleton, UT

Pew's definitions leave something to be desired. For example, here is Pew's policy on illegal aliens:
The term ‘unauthorized migrant’ best encompasses the population in our data because many migrants now enter the country or work using counterfeit documents and thus are not really ‘undocumented’ in the sense that they have documents, but not completely legal documents.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

"Part of what's going on here is that the stigma associated with not being part of any religious community has declined... In some parts of the country, there is still a stigma. But overall, it's not the way it used to be."

This is definite progress!

When will Utah catch up and cease to stigmatize the "nones" (and especially the nonbelievers)?

Candide
Salt Lake City, UT

Other parts of this study mention that the number of atheists and agnostics are dramatically increasing, approximately 13 million people in the U.S. Now that is some of the best news I have heard in a long time. That gives me incredible hope for the future of this country.
"A man is accepted into a church for what he believes and he is turned out for what he knows"
Mark Twain

AZRods
Maricopa, AZ

Yeah we're seeing how California is doing while under the governance of the nones.
And it's economic fault lines are only beginning to emerge.

So if that's progress, I will happily enjoy good old normal-cy

LDS Liberal
Farmington, UT

Geez, I can’t understand why?...
They keep insisting that;

the earth is only 6,000 years old,
Woman don’t have a say as to their own bodies,
that only “they” speak for God,
that the purple TellyTubby is gay,
and tend to be exclusive, rather than inclusive,
to which they can’t even get along nicely amongst themselves…let alone with “unbelievers”.

“I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

A Scientist
Provo, UT

AZRods wrote:

"Yeah we're seeing how California is doing while under the governance of the nones.
And it's economic fault lines are only beginning to emerge."

I cannot even imagine where a person would get such an uninformed idea.

First of all, the number of "unaffiliated" in California is about equal to the national average reported in this article (20%).

Second, California is characterized by about an 8% higher population of Catholics. Mormons in California are just a touch higher than the national average.

Those are the key differences between California and the Nation as regards religious affiliation.

Third, The Current Governor, Jerry Brown, is Catholic.
His predecessor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, was Catholic.
His predecessor, Gray Davis, was Catholic.
His predecessor, Pete Wilson, was Presbyterian.
His predecessor, George Deukmejian, was Armenian Apostolic.
Jerry Brown preceded him (Catholic), and Brown's predecessor was Ronald Reagan, who was Disciples of Christ and later Presbyterian. That's going back to 1980.

So you cannot possibly blame California's economic problems on religiously "unaffiliated" people. You would have to blame it on the last decade of leadership by Catholics and Mormons!

Do you stand by your assertion?

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

A Scientist,

I don't see why you say that "You would have to blame it on the last decade of leadership by Catholics and Mormons!"

I see the recent Catholic governors. But no Mormons.

Where is the Mormon leadership of that state?

A Scientist
Provo, UT

AZRods wrote:

"Yeah we're seeing how California is doing while under the governance of the nones.
And it's economic fault lines are only beginning to emerge."

Now let's consider this:

Arizona and Illinois have the Golden State beat for being in a worse economic and fiscal mess than California.

Arizona is represented by a bunch of Catholics and a Mormon. Not a single "unaffiliated" among them. Mormons comprise over 4% of the population in Arizona (double the national average). Unaffiliated in AZ equals the national average.

Illinois is represented by a mix of Catholics and Protestants. Not a single "unaffiliated" among them. Illinois has a LOWER percentage of "unaffiliated" than the national average. Catholic, Methodist, and Baptist dominate Illinois.

So where on earth would someone get the absurd idea that religiously "unaffiliated" peoples can be blamed for economic problems in any state, at any time, ever?

A Scientist
Provo, UT

Twin Lights,

Hypersensitive much?

Correction: "You would have to blame it on the last decade of leadership by Catholics, and Mormons!"

See how the comma makes all the difference?

But then consider Arizona... did you pay any attention at all to the larger point?

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

A Scientist,

I suppose we must all be aware of hypersensitivity.

So California’s fiscal problems are due to the LDS? Really???

I hope you don't really believe such nonsense.

I read the Arizona post afterwards. It had not come up yet when I posted.

Frankly, I find the whole concept foolish (for good or bad). I just don’t think religion plays much into the question of good governance because I think politicians are rarely that faithful (there are exceptions of course).

My take on it all? There are good and bad fiscal policies by both the religious and the non-religious.

Cinci Man
FT MITCHELL, KY

@ LDS Liberal

I have been religious all my life and know thousands of like-minded folks. I do not know of anyone who believes as your say we do. Perhaps you would like to rephrase every item in your list to be closer to the truth? I am pro-choice, but I qualify it to be 'early choice' and every religious person that I know believes that way. We also believe that there are consequences for our actions and that God is good with that. We believe in the scriptures, but we also know that God's children have foibles and personal opinions about what they interpret for themselves concerning principles they are taught. There are also cultural influences on such interpretation. God asks that we confess our own sins and not those of others. He asks us to be perfect, knowing that we cannot be perfect, YET! He teaches us of consequences. "Go thy way and sin no more" and "Thou shalt not bear false witness" come to my mind as I read your post. Those are good for each of us to remember and practice.

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