Comments about ‘Chaplains help soldiers, families face modern military challenges’

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Published: Friday, Sept. 7 2012 5:00 a.m. MDT

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coltakashi
Richland, WA

Dwight Eisenhower is often ridiculed for saying that having a strong religious faith is important, while noting that he didn't care what faith it was. The critics fail to appreciate how ecumenical the armed forces have to be when troops are deployed and don't have access to a spiritual leader of theur own faith tradition or denomination. Military chaplains recognize that the questions held by soldiers are the same, no matter which answers they have chosen to have faith in. There is a great value found in emphasizing the most basic teachings of Christianity, where there is common understanding across denominations, and promoting a common feeling of unity across doctrinal differences that compkements the unity of all races and ethnicities that is needed in the US armed services.

coltakashi
Richland, WA

The military chaplains corps does not have a problem classifying Mormon chaplains as.Christians and responsibke for conducting generic Protestant services at many military bases. Since most Mormon adult men are literally ordained in the priesthood and are capable of acting as parttime unpaid pastors for theur fellow church members whetever they are deployed, Mormon chaplains are not indispensable to the worship experience for LDS service members. Instead, their primary purpise from the perspective of Mormons in the military is to ensure that their religious rights are regarded as being equal to those of any other denomination. Some bases overseas have ward-sized congregations with families, all without LDS chaplains, that meet on base in the military chapel facilities. In such cases, Mormon usage of the chapel helps to justify the allocation of funds and generic chaplain positions to that installation, which chaplains of otger denominations are grateful for.

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