Quantcast

Comments about ‘Evangelical leaders don't think US is a Christian nation, survey finds’

Return to article »

Published: Saturday, Aug. 4 2012 5:00 a.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
Baccus0902
Leesburg, VA

One of the goals of our nation is to create a society where all its citizens may worship (or not) according to the dictates of their conscience. This fallacy of the U.S. being a Christian nation is a contradiction and a threat to the principles of freedom and the separation between church and state.

Countries that in the past claimed to be Christian nations such as Spain, Portugal and England, among others fell in the same category of oppression and persecution of different ideas that occur in countries such as Iran and Afghanistan under the Taliban, just to name a couple.

The greatest contribution to our nation that we Christians can make is living our principles to the best of our own abilities as individuals and families, doing so will require allowing and demanding a secular form of government and the protection of all currents of opinion and philosophies. Jesus wouldn't have it any other way.

the truth
Holladay, UT

Regardless if this christian country or not,

our founding father recognized we need a religious and moral people for our republic to work.

IN other we need to be a "spiritual" country.

The extreme left have trying to change us into "secular" nation for hundred years now, to our detriment.

Our constitutional republic and the freedom, liberties, and life we enjoy will last only as long we remember God.

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

We do not need to be a "moral" country. We need to be an ethical country

Going to church on Sunday is not required to be ethical
Drinking coffee is not unethical but is immoral in the eyes of the LDS only
Drinking alcohol is not unethical. Drinking to excess COULD lead to unethical consequences.

Give me ethical any day. we can mostly agree on that.

Big difference.

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

Joe Blow. You and I don’t get to decide what is truly moral or ethical, that’s God’s prerogative and His only. If a person doesn’t accept that, then his morality or ethics conflict with other people’s and that causes most of the problems in the world. Ethics and morals in San Francisco tend to be very different than morals and ethics in Utah. Either you or I accept the source of all morals and ethics or we are going to live in a confused world where all behavior is acceptable, there are no absolutes and nothing has any meaning! Kind of like things are today!

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

@Mountanman;

I'm sorry, but the source of ethics and morals is not your god. It isn't anybody's god. Frankly, if you don't like a certain behavior then I suggest you don't conduct said behavior. For myself, I find religious behavior to be exceptionally repulsive; especially when it is used as a reason to discriminate against other people.

George
Bronx, NY

@mounta(i)nman
the God created by men? sorry morals and ethics are the realm of humans always have been always will be. Man may use religion to attempt to popularize their set of morals and ethics but it does not make them any less man made.

KD Lewis
Provo, UT

Why must every religiously related thread turn into a "God said so vs You're crazy for having an imaginary friend" debate. Either argument isn't conducive to civil conversation.

Shelama
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

Morals and moral and ethical systems derive from the evolutionary traits of intelligence, empathy, altruism, cooperative social living, a sense of fairness, protection of individuals and the group, and nurturing, protecting and educating the young.

It's not at all surprising that at least some of the gods and religions created by man were given human, man-made moral and ethical precepts. Nor is it surprising that neither gods nor religion are at all necessary for human to be moral, ethical beings.

Wally West
SLC, UT

The US isn't a Christian Nation. I refer to Article 11 of the Treaty of Tripoli.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments