Comments about ‘What to do about protecting distracted pedestrians’

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Published: Monday, July 30 2012 1:25 a.m. MDT

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Hey It's Me
Salt Lake City, UT

Seriously? What could be so important on your cell phone that it is worth risking your life? Adults my age didn't have cell phones in our 20's and 30's, yet, we seemed to be able to function in life and still get done what was needed. We went home to our answering machines and listened to the messages and returned calls. We managed our lives well and didn't have to be connected to someone else 24/7. I have a cell phone but I don't use it much. I never twitter (I have to much going on in my own life, I don't need to be following someone else's, I don't text I like hearing the persons voice and if they can't answer at the time maybe they shouldn't be reading a text at the time. Modern technology is great, but when it consumes you and you become addicted to it. . not so good. Moderation in all things and a little common sense please.

bikeboy
Boise, ID

"State and local officials are ... asking how far government should go in trying to protect people from themselves."

In this reader's opinion, the government shouldn't have ANY duty to protect people from themselves.

Distracted drivers routinely kill and maim innocent bystanders - people who just happened to be in the wrong place, at the wrong time. By contrast, "distracted pedestrians" for the most part are only exposing themselves to danger. And citizens should have the freedom to consider the risks and benefits, and make those choices for themselves.

BEWARE THE SMART-PHONE ZOMBIES! They're EVERYWHERE nowadays... lurching about, staring at their little screens... waiting for instructions from the Central Scrutinizer. (Pathetic!)

Richard Larson
Galt, CA

Do not do a gosh darn thing!
If they are too stupid to pay attention,
then they deserve to get hit!

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

First identify distracted pedestrians and then fit them with shock collars. We could then get a federal grant to hire people to follow each of them and give them a jolt at appropriate moments.

Short of that the responsibility to avoid trains, cars, and large bodies of water probable belongs on the shoulders of the pedestrian.

Trooper55
Williams, AZ

I believe that they need to inact laws to procect the rail line and buslines from lawsuits which can occur because of people not paying attention to were they are walking. When you can't hear a light rail or a train, or a bus coming, because your talking on a phone texting, or playing a game or listening to music so loud they can't hear. Then they don't pass an law then they should be held 100% liable for their medicial, the cost of the opertator going to have help with what they will go through when they hit and injury or kill someone. This is a big problem and is growing because of stupid people doing these thing and not paying attention to their surroundings. Too many lifes are lost because op people thinking they can mulitask and are not paying attention to what is gone on around them. I do believe that these type of laws are necessay to procect all concren.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

Survival of the fittest.

Those who adapt and are able to multi-task (pay attention and do their techy-stuff) will survive; the rest will die off; probably sooner rather than later in today's mechanized world.

I can't wait for homo superiorus to evolve.

Jeromeo
Salt Lake City, UT

Truly Darwinian. Natural selection of idiots. Levity aside, this also poses a serious threat to others. I am surprised that Utah law on automobile cell phone use is limited to texting. Public safety need be a higher priority than some Legislator's delusional sense of "environmental awareness." As aware as YOU think you are, what about the OTHER GUY who is about to T-Bone your family's car?

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Hey, I've got a novel idea, why not put some horns, whistle, or bells on the trains and track systems so people know they are coming? Federal train laws require something so why not start with that.

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