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Comments about ‘Letter: Finding out the "why" behind the rising tuition costs’

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Published: Tuesday, June 12 2012 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Esquire
Springville, UT

One reason is excessive endowment funds. This is a huge scandal.

Jac0m
Provo, UT

Sam I know you!!! Hi!
Guess to narrow it I was in your English class with "t" and Mac daddy. And yeah, tuition is out of control. Who knows why, but it seems like something there are many things that drive the costs. (benefits ever on the increase due to legislation, sports costing or wanting more, financial aide for more affirmative action students, PR campaigns for the University...who knows.)

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

But declining state revenue given to higher education institutions IS one of the main reasons for Utah's tuition increases the last couple years.

SEY
Sandy, UT

I have to believe that higher education costs are in an economic bubble, much like real estate was. And just as real estate priced itself out of the market, student debt is getting maxxed out. College education (yes, I have a BA degree) is overrated and overpriced for most students. That's why so few actually obtain their degrees ("College: the best seven years of my life!").

Whether they finish or not, they live with school loan debt for the next 10 or so years, or they default. The deliquency rate is close to 25% and climbing. That inevitably means another series of bank bailouts.

George Will wrote an excellent column a few days ago about this very subject. Courses have become watered down, especially for liberal arts students, just so they can attract and keep students who might otherwise have dropped out earlier.

There are alternatives to the expensive traditional route that the writer and other students should explore, particularly the colleges of the future online.

CLM
Draper, UT

Great comment, SEY. I completely agree. I'd add that college grads aren't being trained for the jobs that are available, either. There's a definite disconnect. I'm familiar with several grads who have pursued and obtained degrees, both undergraduate and graduate, only to find very few job opportunities in their fields of study...and the albatross of a large school loan around their necks.

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