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Comments about ‘U.S. shirks energy know-how, poll finds’

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Despite high awareness, most do little to conserve

Published: Saturday, June 9 2012 8:21 p.m. MDT

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My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

I think this story is very misleading and a lie about the American people. It is our president slandering us for our lifestyles and prosperity, not our conservation efforts and contributions we have and do contribute. This president is looking for a legacy namesake and anything expensive whether it works or not is his legacy. He is jealous of past presidents who thought of and created a dream and goal for this country, he thinks Socialism is his legacy.

Electric cars is a laugh and a hoax. They have 1,000 pounds of batteries that are not disposable or reusable or manufactured to last beyond a 6 year life span 100 mile tourism. The car companies and battery makers and the president implies they are permanent and never need changing but this technology is limited and falsely represented by the media and Obama.

The American people are far more advanced in the technology of times and we are the most efficient users of energy in every form. Without the Americans and their ingenuity, we would be using horse and buggy and polluting with methane gas and not NOX and hydrogen gases.

Brother Chuck Schroeder
A Tropical Paradise USA, FL

"When it comes to saving energy, people in the United States know that driving a fuel-efficient car accomplishes more than turning off the lights at home." Is this the Koch Brother's elite's agenda for enslaving the human race. With alcohol fuel, you can become energy independent, reverse global warming, and survive Peak Oil in style. Alcohol fuel is "liquid sunshine" and can't be controlled by transnational corporations. You can produce alcohol for less than $1 a gallon, using a wide variety of plants and waste products, from algae to stale donuts. It's a much better fuel than gasoline, and you can use it in your car, right now. You can even use alcohol to generate electricity. Alcohol fuel production is ecologically sustainable, revitalizes farms and communities, and creates huge new opportunities for small-scale businesses. Its byproducts are clean and valuable. Alcohol has a proud history and a vital future. I am not here to make excuses for the shortcomings of George Bush or for Ronald Reagan nor am I a shill for Mitt Romney and claim allegiance to no political party.

NONE of this going green hogwash works.

terra nova
Park City, UT

We own three Honda Civic GX models. They run exclusively on natural gas, the same stuff most of us use to heat our homes. In Utah, natural gas for automobiles costs $1.49 at the pump. My cars get about 35 miles-per-gas-to-gasoline-equivalent BTU. The emissions are 30% cleaner than gasoline. The EPA has rated it the cleanest car in America since its introduction in 1998 (this includes the all-electric Nissan Leaf, and the dual-mode Chevy Volt).

Natural gas is plentiful. Industry experts say US supply will last 200-years. It is local. When I buy it it is not only cheaper than gasoline, the money remains local. It does not go support countries that do not like us much. It keeps people working HERE. And it clears the air. On a bad-air day in Salt Lake, the EXHAUST from my car is cleaner than the air we are breathing.

If we all did our part, and used our heads, little by little, everything would become better. I keep a gasoline-car for occasional trips into areas without natural-gas stations. But I should probably sell it and rent when I need one.

Baron Scarpia
Logan, UT

@ terra nova

To echo your comments, what America needs is diversification of transportation fuels -- thus, we need more natural gas, electric, and biofuels to diversify options for American drivers.

Basic finance tells us diversification of a resource portfolio reduces the overall costs of all of those resources. America is supposed to be all about freedom of choice, but when it comes to energy -- we have no choices. We're stuck on oil and we're at the mercy of utility monopolies (for pricing AND energy mix -- here in Utah, mostly coal).

When there's no free market, then government must step in to unlock the lack of freedom. That involves market incentives (similar to what the fossil fuel companies get when they drill) for alternatives.

Of course, this requires that policymakers recognize the lack of a "free market" when they see it. Too often, I hear Utah policymakers say "markets over mandates" ... but the problem is, in energy there is no free market. As a consumer, I can't "vote" with my dollars for different energy unless I do something extraordinary like retrofit my car to natural gas or buy solar panels.

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