Comments about ‘What others say: Entitlement alarms sounding once again’

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Published: Wednesday, May 2 2012 12:00 a.m. MDT

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John Charity Spring
Back Home in Davis County, UT

All patriotic Americans should be absolutely alarmed about the out of control growth of entitlement programs in this Country. Indeed, these programs must be eliminated before this great Nation sinks into an abyss of debt from which it can never climb out of.

Why do we permit an entire class of lazy, slothful people to collect government funds to finance a lifestyle of sitting around watching television in basements? These people should be required to provide for themselves and not be allowed to live off the hard work of others.

These entitlement programs destroy the work ethic of the public and replace it with a selfish demand to be taken care of without limit. If this? Continues, it won't be long before there is no one left to tax to pay for these entitlement programs.

marxist
Salt Lake City, UT

"Why do we permit an entire class of lazy, slothful people to collect government funds to finance a lifestyle of sitting around watching television in basements? " My grandfather who was a champion of social security (and served in the Utah Legislature as a New Dealer) was a Spanish American War Veteran (decorated) and a hero of the Scofield Mine disaster. How dare you describe him and people like him in this manner?

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

I definitely think entitlements needs to be reformed....

Afghanistan is set to receive economic financial aid from the US for the next 15 years... Here's an idea, GROW YOUR OWN ECONOMY! We have our own to fix!

Cut all foreign aid. ZERO. It's GONE. No more handouts to non-Americans.

Cut military spending by 1/2. The military will become more efficient with having to work with less. Way too much is being spent on waste.

No more spending on the F-22 Raptor. The ol F-16s and F-18s can get the job done. I know I know, Boehner lobbied long and hard to get the building of those jet engines into his state. But the fact is, they're really expensive, defective, and we just don't need them.

Raise taxes to Clinton like levels.

No more subsidies to big oil. They're already making record profits.

Break up the big banks.... LIKE YESTERDAY!

Adjust SS, folks making over 150k shouldn't have access to it.

Medicare part D, get rid of it.

No more health insurance to Congress. they can pay for their own benefits.

So I agree, entitlement reform needs to be made!

Brother Chuck Schroeder
A Tropical Paradise USA, FL

Let Social Security and Medicare alone. Is this the best the RNC has put together for 2012?. God forgives people for their "oops moments" even if the American electorate does not, failed Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry said, but is that like when "Octomom" files for bankruptcy in California?. (Congress hould do the same if we are so broke.) The Texas governor famously muttered "oops" during a presidential debate when he couldn't remember the third federal department he'd promised to eliminate if elected. That's almost like saying, President Barack Obama and Wall Street occupiers, along with their allies in the mainstream media and on college campuses, have maintained an ongoing attack on high-income earners, people they call 1 percenters. These 1 percenters are the wealthy right-wing Republicans. It's the Koch Brother's that are simply running a deceitful rope-a-dope, aided by the mainstream FOX media, on the American people.

Unless your a War Veteran (decorated) and a hero you got nothing to say about "OUR" Social Security and Medicare.

I told you I would tell you the truth, I never said you'll like it.

My views.

Roland Kayser
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Social Security needs some minor tweaks to stay solvent. Medicare will be the program that ate the government if we don't make some major reforms. This will entail Medicare providers making less money and Medicare recipients not getting every service they want. There is no painless solution. Both groups will hate it and fight tooth an nail to stop any reform.

To "John Charity Spring: Any politician running on a platform to eliminate Social Security and Medicare would lucky to get 5% of the vote. It will never happen, so we should concentrate on finding ways to fix them.

Gildas
LOGAN, UT

To: the ignorant and / or the blatantly lying:

The receipt of Social Security, far from being a welfare payment to the lazy, is a modest stipend paid for by years of large premiums by those who have worked, on average, much longer than the average American.

If the USA is the "greatest nation" on earth it is because, as De Toqueville said its people are of the best: America is great because America is good. If America ceases to be good America will cease to be great.

I suspect the statements repeatedly made by a certain contemptible poster may just be "flaming" and not really worthy of a serious answer. 76% of Americans young and old approve the Social Security system. It could of course be made a simple option for those who have paid nothing into it yet.

Interestingly the most voluble opponents of Social Security have never once addressed those 413 congressmen in receipt of a very "generous" pension averaging $60,000 a year fully vested after only twenty years, who may retire at 50 yrs old or younger, who misspent the $2.5 trillion contributions of those "ordinary" retirees who receive typically less than $15K annually.

lost in DC
West Jordan, UT

Interesting that the article does not mention one of the reasons for the acceleration of SS's insolvency is BO cut SS's funding significantly so he could buy votes with his payroll withholding cuts. Roll those back and SS fares better longer.

JCS,
SS does not go to lazy basement dwellers. It goes to the aged and disabled. There should be better controls to ensure those receiving disability are not lazy basement dwellers and alcoholism should NOT be one of the qualifying disabilities, but the vast majority of recipients are retirees who are only getting back based on what THEY themselves paid in.

Maverick,
I see you and I agree that dudd-frank failed to end too-big-to-fail and the large banks should have been BROKEN up, much like the Bell system in the 1980s. But you will remember even BO's advisors told him in late 2010 tax increases at the time were very dangerous to the fragile recovery. You think BO would sign a bill raising taxes in the middle of a close election?

louie
Cottonwood Heights, UT

The social security scare is more of a tempest in a tea pot when compared to the deficits that exist and are ever increasing with the general fund budget. When are we going to focus on real priorities?

Mountanman
Hayden, ID

The problem is,we are $16 trillion in debt and growing by a billion/day!

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

"The problem is,we are $16 trillion in debt and growing by a billion/day!"

I know right? We're throwing away 6 billion a month to Afghanistan! 122 million per F-22 airplane!

Esquire
Springville, UT

The alarms are sounding, but the solutions are simple. But no one wants to ask the wealthy to carry a fair share and give back. Instead many want to elect leaders who keep off shore bank accounts and pay lower tax rates. Here is an example. Social Security tax. Lift the the maximum taxable earnings amount for Social Security (OASDI) taxes from $110,100 to $200,000 or even unlimited. Problem solved. But as Sen. Coburn (R-OK) said last year in his report, we have too many welfare programs for the rich and the GOP won't let them be touched. Refer to the new book by Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein, and then let's talk.

lost in DC
West Jordan, UT

Esquire
the wealthy already pay MORE than their fair share in income taxes.

Raising the maximum allowable earnings does not solve the problem. Benefits are based on what the beneficiary has paid in. The more someone pays in, the more they get back. So while raising the allowable earnings increases the revenues, it also increases SS's OBLIGATIONS. I wish your solution was that simple.

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