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Published: Monday, April 23 2012 2:20 a.m. MDT

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AmPatriot
Taylorsville, UT

Is any of this really a surprise? After there 22 years under the control of government sponsored education and its terms and conditions is bearing the fruits of its deceptions.

First of all for eduction to have meaning there has to be jobs that will accommodate an education. What the US has done is take all its gambled on eduction of a nation embroiled in poverty, with no industry, no manufacturing, and excessive unemployment as if it was an industrialized growing nation. We are no longer an industrialized nation but a nation trying to create technology as an industry. The experiment failed because we put the cart before the horse then threw away the cart. We have a horse with no cart to pull, they just feed and service the other horses with food and beds and keep them healthy.

Instead of technology being a tool, we have made a tool that has no use. It's like we keep trying to reinvent the wheel instead of using the wheel to move things and make a product to move. Technology is created by the diversity of jobs and people working and without people working its dead end education and technology.

srh83
Hillsboro, OR

I think the real issue is that too many students are choosing majors that have little job opportunity. The first example in the story is about a young man who graduated in creative writing. That's great to enjoy writing, but there really aren't that many job options in that field. Actuarial work in contrast has a 98%+ placement rate for graduates.

LindonMan
Lindon, UT

I think the real problem is all the students receiving worthless BA degrees that really have no benefit in the work place.

GZE
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

There is no such thing as a worthless BA degree. There are benefits to a well-rounded education outside of gross annual wages. And a well-educated person will find work before one who is not. Many fields simply require a college degree; they don't care if it's in Business or French.

As far as technology being a "tool with no use," it will be the job of this current crop of graduates to find the uses. We who are older cannot imagine.

Finally, If you do a bit a research I believe you will discover that the USA is still number one in the world for manufacturing and heavy industry. Perhaps these are the fields where uses can be found for that useless technology.

Alex H.
Provo, UT

One question for the author: what percentage of graduates are unemployed, not because they can't get work, but because they had to go back for graduate work? I just got a B.S. in a biological specialty, but neither I nor any of my friends with my degree were stupid enough to look for a job yet. To my knowledge, ALL of us are in Ph.D., M.D., D.O., or other graduate or professional programs.

worf
Mcallen, TX

This is evidence of

* standardized testing not working.
* jobs are going to foreigners who work for less and are better educated.
* government run schools are expensive and ineffective.
* cooperative, group, new math, reading, science learning programs brought on by useless research groups are hindering real education.
* increased dependence and poverty of our American people.

This is what happens when the voice of the people are silent, and we make government the king.

DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Shocked, shocked, I tell you!

No jobs for the graduates of the Gender Studies programs, or the finest African Literature majors? Diversity Specialists and Human Resources Managers begging for work?

Colleges are the upper strata of the "Government Skools Indoctrination Program" and the results are showing. They are not looking for what employers want, but delivering what the liberal academic elites think should be provided.

Bill Gates never graduated, and he seemed to make out okay.

Maybe if collecge taught more about conservatism and the benefits of smaller government, lower taxation, personal responsibility and initiative there would be more jobs. But, the idea of "diversity" in academia does not tolerate conservative views.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

A kids gets a creative writing degree and he's surprised he hasn't gotten a job?!

I'm shocked too! Well, time to go jump in a tent and blame someone else for his problems.

The_Kaiser
Holladay, UT

Could it be that by spending more than we earn, we hurt future generations? Could it be that we have ingrained into this upcoming generation that debt is not an important value of economics?

Blame the youth for their lack of employment, but lets face it: it is the more-tenured generation that have spent 15 trillion dollars of their children's money and through their greed run this country into the ground. We will reap what the older generations have sowed for us.

worf
Mcallen, TX

People from India, China, Phillipins, South Korea, etc ate coming to our country and taking our skilled jobs. While we hold the worlds record for educational funding, our children are being left behind. We should boycott standardized testing, and other other wasteful programs.

tenx
Santa Clara, UT

Phillipins = Philippines. Maybe this is the new economics promised by BO. You don't need a job, just the government to take care of you.

worf
Mcallen, TX

A couple articles from DN & comments:

* "Right now, it's a limited talent pool," said John Spigiel, general manager at Watson Labs, an arm of New Jersey-based Watson Pharmaceuticals.--DN
Many companies are struggling with finding talent--Washington Post.

* 1 in 2 new graduates are jobless or underemployed'--DN

What does this say of our education? In Texas, more than a billion dollars, and forty five days per school year are spent on standardized testing, and benchmarking. Many useless teaching strategies are mandated, and now our talent pool is limited?

raybies
Layton, UT

50% unemployment rate! Now there's a stat Obama can be PROUD of...

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