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Comments about ‘Michael Gerson: Romney still has a lot of problems to overcome’

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Published: Wednesday, April 4 2012 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Roland Kayser
Cottonwood Heights, UT

In other words--Romney needs to shake the etch-a-sketch and reveal the New Nixon-er-Romney.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

this election is all about the economy. Romney has all the tools and now he has to use them. Obama is an empty suit.... a side show at best. Romney needs to stick to the economy - play hard ball as Reagan did with Carter. Romney needs to tell Americans that unemployment should be 5% right now - which it would be under any other president in the past 25 years ... other than Obama. Romney needs to make clear what a 20 trillion Obama debt would mean to Average Americans - interest rates would sky rocket. Finally - Mitt needs to simply slam dunk over Obama and the economy is his best shot!

Henry Drummond
San Jose, CA

Mitt Romney conducts his campaign for the Republican nomination oblivious to how it affects his chances in the fall. He floods the airways with an unprecedented volume of negative advertising demonizing his opponents and painting himself as being a true right-wing candidate. As the articles suggests, he doesn't seem to understand that independents and moderates are hearing these ads as well. The end result is wins his share of primaries but loses the support he desperately needs to best Obama in the Fall. It isn't a coincidence that the President or his surrogates tend to show up in these states to win independents for the Democrats after Romney is done alienating them. Romney won Florida, but now Obama is significantly ahead in that swing state. The same phenomena has happened in Ohio. If Romney follows through on his plan to swamp Rick Santorum with negative ads in his home state of Pennsylvania, that state will go democratic as well.

Romney not only is unable to speak the language of politics, he is tone deaf as well.

UtahBlueDevil
Durham, NC

Here is my spin on it.

The city I live in, as I assume most other do as well, has an elected Mayor and then a hired city manager. I think Romney would be fantastic as the city manager job to the president. There absolutely are areas where the government could be far more productive and cost effective than it is now. Same goes for any large entity. Sometimes you need fresh eyes to come in and challenge why things have been done the way they are done.

Romney would be fantastic at that. I had earlier hopes he would be a fantastic president, but I don't have faith in him in that role anymore. But as a manager chartered to streamline our government, he probably would be fantastic.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

I'm thinkin' losing to President Obama is one of those problems.

The Skeptical Chymist
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

@patriot

The recession that Obama inherited was the worst economic situation the country has faced since the Great Depression. Without very aggressive action, it would have developed into another Great Depression. Comparing Obama's economy to other recoveries (at least those in the past 25 years) is like comparing a garter snake to a Burmese python. The reason it has taken so long for a recovery to take hold is that government spending has NOT grown under Obama. In fact, when all government spending (Federal, State, and Local) is included, government spending has been fairly constant during Obama's time in office. The big problem is that revenue has decreased. This will be rectified when the Bush tax cuts expire and the recovery strengthens. The government should adopt a policy of paying down its debt in good times, and increasing its deficit spending in bad economic times. This would go a long way toward taming the boom-bust cycle. Of course, it would help to regulate the financial industry more as well, so that we get away from privatizing profits and socializing losses with the bailout of giant industries that are "too big to fail".

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