Comments about ‘President Monson offers tips to help young women navigate life's storms’

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Published: Sunday, March 25 2012 12:06 a.m. MDT

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Beverly
Eden, UT

In stead of teaching young women to "obey" wouldn't it be better to teach them to "lead?"

Beverly
Eden, UT

Rather than teaching young women to "Obey" wouldn't it be better to teach them to lead? Inculcating the idea that young women should obey limits their growth in our society.

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

Re: Beverly 7:49 a.m. March 25, 2012
"In stead of teaching young women to "obey" wouldn't it be better to teach them to "lead?"

It is quite appropriate for a prophet to warn our youth of the dangers and snares in their path that can lead to unhappiness. Tell young women to avoid drugs and premarital sex certainly doesn't limit their growth in our society.

Teach the youth correct principles and then let them govern themselves.

uncommonsense
CENTERVILLE, UT

Don't all of you obey laws that help society run more smoothly? Do you bother to understand what was meant by "Obey"?

"Obey. "Obey your parents," President Monson admonished. "Obey the laws of God. They are given to us by a loving Heavenly Father. If they are obeyed, our lives will be more fulfilling, less complicated. Our challenges and problems will be easier to bear. We will receive the Lord's promised blessings. ... You have but one life to live. Keep it as free from trouble as you can."

A simple admonition to help you be happier in your life. But fine, choose not to obey and suffer the consequences of poorer health, problems with the law, poverty because you didn't finish school. All problems I have seen because "obey" was replaced by "rebel" and "indulge".

Beverly
Eden, UT

Why is the word "Obey" directed at young women? The responses to my concern have been generalized to incorporate the "youth." If it is good to obey, why is it consistently directed at young women and not young men?

Elder Dave
Livermore, CA

To Beverly,

The "obey" is directed at the young men too. Just ask a full time Missionary.

There's many many rules "to obey". All Latter-day Saints (Male and Female)

are admonished to obey. This is not aimed at any one gender over the other.

To "obey" the leadership, that the Lord has Chosen, is just a Good Idea.

President Monson also "obeys" the counsel from the LORD.

Beverly
Eden, UT

Lets hope that the same admonishment will be given to young men. Instead of just young women. The subservient role directed at women in the church instead of all members is my point. The future needs women to be culturally supported to be leaders not followers. To obey is a Utah cultural value that still hurts women.

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

Beverly, I am a leader in various aspects of my life including in the community and at work, so let me share one simple truth that appears to elude you: Before you learn to lead, you must first learn to obey.

No general started out as a general. First he went through years of training at the feet of a commanding officer. He has obeyed 10 times longer than he will ever lead.

Rare is the CEO who started out as a CEO. He likely spent years working for "the man", being asked to do things he didn't necessarily agree with, but he did his best at them anyway.

And so it is with our young people: Before they can lead in their workplaces, communities, and homes, first they need to learn how to follow.

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: Elder Dave, The "obey" is directed at the young men too. Just ask a full time Missionary. There's many many rules "to obey". All Latter-day Saints (Male and Female) are admonished to obey.
The Fifth Commandment ,Exodus 20:12 "Honor your father and your mother.
Ephesians 6:2,3. Honor your Father and Mother”[not Mothers],which is the first commandment with a promise. God distinguishes father and mother from all other persons on earth, chooses them and sets them next to Himself, occupying the highest place in our lives next to God.

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