Comments about ‘Power plant killing cows? Court clears expert to testify’

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Published: Sunday, Jan. 22 2012 10:01 p.m. MST

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botdriver
Midvale, UT

I wonder why they haven't checked the ground for current, should be simple to do.

Drive 2 8 ft copper grounding rods in the ground 6 inches apart and use a meter you should be able to register a voltage, if there is any leaking voltage it should be read, and a power station putting out 3 to 1000 Megawatts of power that could be measured to some extreme, as power follows the least resistance and water conducts,and any moisture in the ground, it would and could go a long ways, and if it is significant it could disrupt any living organisms body function.

Even worms would be disturbed by any type of electrical current, they would be fighting to get out of the ground by a fight or flee response. In this case Deltas power plant puts out 950 Megawatts, that's significant enough and if there is leakage into the ground it could disrupt a big area. Bad grounds can cause this, as it gives a direct path to the soil.

Electricity is silent and invisible, if your not looking for it, and that's the X-factor, you just really don't know. Anyone getting shocked in showers?

My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Commenter brought up a good point about the showers but that's not a likely scenario becasue all water systems in a home and business are grounded to protect people and children from electrical shock. We also have GFI fault interrupters in commercial and home wiring.

The flow of electricity from the ground to the object touching it. So if there is a breakdown in the grounding of the IPP station or any of its towers electricity will flow through the ground until it finds something to route it. The cows are like an electrical wire passing power and voltage from lip (POC) to hoofs as it travels on its way to seeking a ground.

This defense team should get hold of an OSHA and MSA manual that covers power and grounds requirements for industry and home use. Also request the log records of the periodic conductivity testing of every ground rod installed and required by law.

More than likely the contractor or IPP design specs were altered at the power plant or towers to put fewer shortened, less than 8 foot+ (.9999% copper), ground rods to save money.

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