Comments about ‘Gov. Gary Herbert touts rural economic development’

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Governor says towns will need better infrastructure

Published: Tuesday, Oct. 11 2011 10:51 p.m. MDT

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DR Hall
Clearfield, UT

Yes, talking about jobs and education is nice to rural Utah, but doing something about it is more important. This last legislature cut funding for public education but added money for their buddies in business with additional contracts. So in Utah it seems that talk is all these so-called will do and take no action. The Republicans in Congress are doing the same non-action on jobs and smiling about it. We need to cut Congress' salary to minimum wage for the next 5 years with no benefits and see how load they throw their tantrums!

MyChildrensKeeper
Taylorsville, UT

The Governor Herbert has been touting off for about 3 years now in the more populated northern half of the state and our economy is still sub-par and stalled with no improvements except with what he has scammed from Washing under false pretense and wrongful use spending.

Herbert has not created any roll over jobs or benefits for businesses or citizens from all the government spending on roads or state construction. That is all materials and subcontracting has been done with China and other foreign countries, even Mexico to supply us with cheap labor for UDOT. Cheap labor is an economoic dead end fund that dries up as soon as they are paid and the American tax paying workers are denied jobs because of racist slave labor.

Herbert is becoming an enemy of the state and his spending is uncontrolled and irrational considering the recession/depression we are in. More bonding and property taxation has doubled as a result of tax losses from job loss and sales tax spending losses. Raising taxes for any reason in a recession is a clear indication of overspending and poor judgment government actions.

Baron Scarpia
Logan, UT

One of the biggest opportunities facing rural communities is renewable energy development. Milford's Wind Project is a model example of how a large wind project for exporting power to California can infuse millions of dollars into rural towns for economic development.

San Juan is looking at wind power as well as that county -- one of the poorest in the nation -- desparately needs economic development.

The challenge is that agricultural can no longer keep kids "on the farm." Most see no opportunities in sticking with their families' farms and are forced to leave for more urban opportunities. We see too many farms being sold off to developers for homes. Once farmland is taken out of growing food, it is gone forever.

What's nice about renewable energy development is that agricultural can still continue around wind turbines and solar panels, technologies that don't use and compete with ag's need for water (thus, they're ag-friendly). They also create local high-tech, high-paying jobs, allowing rural kids to stay on their family farms and their communities to continue their quality rural lifestyles.

Finally, renewable energy allows energy dollars (property taxes, land leases) to stay in this country to benefit rural regions.

JohnJacobJingleHeimerSchmidt
Beverly Hills, CA

How about he just give out more 13 million $ block grants like he did for that campaign contributor?

XelaDave
Salem, UT

I have worked in rural economic development for the last decade plus in the Northeast and Midwest- almost everything the Gov. says here has been shown time and again to not work in rural economic development- it sounds good- if you build it they will come- but expereince across the US and here in Utah shows otherwise but hey why complicate things with empirical evidence when a soundbite will do- nice little day trips into rural Utah will do very little but he did get some press coverage and that was probably the real purpose of all of this- if we are honest rural is loosing the fight and hoping the urban areas will take pitty is never going to work- just wait until reapportionment is over especially for rural areas in the Utah Legislature then we will see just how bad off rural really is in terms of future representation- forget the federal districts and look at the internal stuff- it will be painful how much is lost for rural

cbird
Sandy, ut

Did these kids need to have a permission slip to listen to him, like they did for the President? I THINK NOT!!!

one old man
Ogden, UT

EAGLE FORUM REPUBLICAN PARTY ALERT :: Parents, demand that your school allow your student to opt out of attending this insidious attempt to brainwash your children.

Ooops. Sorry. That only applies when President Obama is speaking. Cancel that alert.

L
Central, Utah

We have great roads, high speed internet & good cell phone service BUT....

That hasn't solved the problem so the Governor is going to have to be more innovative cause things aren't booming in our rural areas.

Instead of using the State incentive money and lobbying to get new things for the meto area, cut that and multiply for rural areas. For EVERY new business that comes to the State make it a mandatory question "Can this Company locate in Rural Utah?" Then if not figure out what would be needed to make that work whether bigger power lines, schools etc.

When they were working on oil shale in Colorado, the company built a whole new town for their workers including utilities, recreation facilities, schools etc. That helped that rural area even after they shut down the oil shale operation.

How about reduced State taxes for any rural area?

gmak
Spanish Fork, UT

Well my daughter, Heather Warr, will tell you that there is NO cell service in Grouse Creek. And until last year, they had no high speed internet unless they went with a satellite service. This is truly RURAL. They are an hour and a half from the closest grocery store, and their kids have to live away from home in order to attend school after 10th grade. But they love it there, and she says there isn't a better place to raise kids.

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