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Comments about ‘Review: Disparate assortment of LDS facts in 'Mormon History 101'’

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Published: Saturday, Oct. 8 2011 5:00 a.m. MDT

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Yorkshire
City, Ut

To Mark Twain:
As to _your characterization of the Book of Mormon being "chloroform in print", it takes one, as they say, to know one.

johnbh99
Thonotosassa, FL

In "Roughing It" Mark Twain also related his appealing to Brigham Young to assist him in getting a Mormon to fulfill his contract with Twain. Brigham studied the contract, called the man in and told him that he should fulfill the contract to the letter even if it impoverished him in the process. Twain asserted that the contractor went to work without a another word.

watcher@75
SMITHFIELD, UT

The Book of Mormon was not written to appease literary appetites. It was translated from ancient records. Those who actually wrote upon the gold plates told how difficult it was to do so. They wrote the best way they could. Joseph Smith translated their writings as best he could. We have a marvelous book of scripture that testifies of the reality of Jesus Christ as the Savior of the world. Reading the Book of Mormon requires a spiritual sentiment, otherwise, one will easily become groggy and doze (speaking from personal experience). Once read with the spiritual intent required, the spiritual awakening is explosive.

Clifton Palmer McLendon
Gilmer, Texas

"The author of 'Mormon History 101' would be a good candidate to devise an LDS version of Trivial Pursuit, but that board game has long faded away as a popular pastime."

Don't forget Jots & Tittles -- the LDS trivia game!

"As a footnote, the answers to the questions above are John Horner; Aug. 10, 1948; and 1.5 ounces."

As for the first Thanksgiving in Deseret: I think the date should read 1848 rather than 1948.

JustSoYouKnow
Pleasant Grove, UT

Thanks for catching the typo, Clifton! Article was revised following your observation.

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