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Comments about ‘Colorado couple charged in artifacts case lost everything, attorney says’

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Published: Thursday, Aug. 11 2011 6:14 p.m. MDT

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DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Attorney General Eric Holder's Justice Deparment made a good case against these people who obviously were breaking the law, and has successfully prosecuted them to the full extent, and the courts have meted out harsh sentences.

Now, while it may be a crime to steal Indian artifacts from public land, is this sort of crime the type that our federal law enforcment officials should be prosecuting with such vigor, with massive raids, prolonged investigations and trials?

Does anyone else think that our country would be much better served if the feds were out there going after illegal alien drug dealers and violent criminals, or even just enforcing our borders? Maybe go after some gang bangers and meth dealers (of whatever nationality)? Or even going after voter fraud? And maybe criminals who defraud the government though scams like ACORN? Or investigating the BATFE for their arming of Mexican drug gangs?

Compare the consequences for any of these other types of criminals with what has been done to a pair of 70 year olds on a relatively insignificant crime.

Is this justice?

ted001
Cottonwood Heights, UT

I am a bit puzzled by the above comment. Correct me if I am wrong but this is about Lavern Crites being found guilty in the court of law.

So, this is not about:
illegal alien drug dealers and violent criminals
gang bangers and meth dealers
voter fraud
criminals who defraud the government though scams like ACORN?
investigating the BATFE for their arming of Mexican drug gangs

If you're thinking about becoming a defense lawyer I suggest to change your mind.

pharmacist
South Jordan, UT

Where is the ACLU in all this. The Government is saying this is sacred ground that is gov. property and people can not hunt artifacts. Seems to me that this should be classifed as gov. support of relgion just as much as crosses placed on public land where Police officers have died.

one old man
Ogden, UT

To DN Subscriber | 6:37 p.m. Aug. 11, 2011
Cottonwood Heights, UT

The answers to all your questions is a resounding, "Yes."

The man was a crook. Plain and simple. Just like one of the illegal aliens you enjoy crying about.

Lagomorph
Salt Lake City, UT

DNS: "Attorney General Eric Holder's Justice Deparment made a good case against these people who obviously were breaking the law, and has successfully prosecuted them to the full extent, and the COURTS HAVE METED OUT HARSH SENTENCES." [emphasis added]

Huh? Haven't all those arrested received probation for felony convictions?

arand
Huntsville, u

I wonder how much land is desecrated every time they put up one of their casinos. I also wonder how many lives are also destroyed by the gambling in the casinos?

I did a job once for a Native American Indian Chief involved with casinos. He had an 8,000 square foot house on a lake, 5 fireplaces, an 8 car garage with out buildings. There was a mantle over one fireplace about 30 feet long all hand carved. That alone must have cost a fortune. I won't say what tribe he belonged to, but I have been on his reservation and all I saw were shacks.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

pharmacist |
Where is the ACLU in all this. The Government is saying this is sacred ground that is gov. property and people can not hunt artifacts. Seems to me that this should be classifed as gov. support of relgion just as much as crosses placed on public land where Police officers have died.

This isnt about religious symbolism, its about theft, thank goodness the graves they were robbing werent marked or it would have made it easier to desecrate them, but nice jab at the ACLU, who as far as I know has never said a thing about a cemetery, or a burial plot.

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