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Comments about ‘Outdoor Retailer Summer Market too big for Salt Palace?’

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Published: Monday, Aug. 8 2011 3:57 p.m. MDT

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My2Cents
Kearns, UT

This story is a warning notice that they will be raising taxes again to build a bigger building.

Don't get too excited yet about another bonding tax to make additions to or increase the size of the Salt Palace, at some point this market is going to dry up and not have this convention anymore. Outdoor and sports no longer have the priority of consumers it once had. Most sports stores and showing signs of losing its market base as the economy keeps declining. Outdoor recreation is no longer cheap and easy to find. Once a location is found, its too expensive to go there.

toosmartforyou
Farmington, UT

Give O'Bana economics a little more time and they won't have to worry about the show getting too big. Like everything else it will shrink as the national debt continues to expand, out of xontrol. Then the tax-and-spend liberals can blame the Tea Party once again.

county mom
Monroe, UT

Limited access to the mountains, canyons and public lands; and a poor economy will shorten the life of this particular industry.

Makid
Kearns, UT

My2Cents,

"This story is a warning notice that they will be raising taxes again to build a bigger building."

You may not be aware but the only tax that is increased to pay for the convention center is the Transient Room Tax (TRT). This is assessed to those who stay at hotels and motels throughout the Salt Lake valley. This doesn't affect anyone who doesn't frequent the hotels and motels.

This tax is primarily imposed on those who are using hte services that are provided by the convention center, conventioneers.

I am all for the county using and even increasing the TRT to help pay for the convention center expansion as well as the 1000+ room convention hotel to keep the Outdoor Retailers show here and to help attract other large conventions to the area.

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