Comments about ‘Hill civilian's engineering saves millions on F-16 repairs’

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Published: Tuesday, Aug. 2 2011 5:06 p.m. MDT

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My2Cents
Kearns, UT

People outside of the civilian side of the government workers are seldom given the information like this that has many times proven their value to government. They save more than they cost governmernt. They never hear about government workers saving taxpayers money, all the outsiders hear is they are lazy, overpaid, and organized by unions. Organized workers are the backbone of the Amrican dream and American prosperity.

Workers like this which the DOD acknowledged that workeers are sometime the best engineers in government and saving money. Workers take engineering beyond the textbook and degrees of licensed engineers to a whole new level making profound differences as an asset to its employers, the tax payers.

Even in private industry this fact is recognized by large manufacturing and industrial companies. The biggest draw back to corporation putting cheap and slave labor to excessive to profits, they forget the workers made the company and those that have deserted america are finding this out. Along with the millions of Americans and the poor quality and workmanship of imported products.

DeltaFoxtrot
West Valley, UT

Amazing what can be done when government is taken out of the equation.

VST
Bountiful, UT

Just a clarification on the comment made by @My2Cents.

Terry Rettenberger is an Equipment Specialist; not an Engineer, which makes his contribution even more remarkable. Engineers in Civil Service are required to have a degree in Engineering. Equipment Specialists, though some have college degrees, do not need a degree in Engineering. Degree holding Civil Service engineers provide a supporting role to the Equipment Specialists, many of which have no degree.

Kudos to Terry for his significant creative thinking "outside the box" to get the job done.

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