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Comments about ‘Wendover Enola Gay hangar being restored’

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Published: Saturday, May 21 2011 10:53 a.m. MDT

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Moderate
Salt Lake City, UT

Too bad they can no longer teach about this in Tennessee.

Reasonable Person
Layton, UT

"That's not a big surprise because for nearly 60 years, the hangar was neglected, its walls rusting and windows broken."

Maybe because it's only one of several bases that the Enola Gay crew trained at?

How come the people that want money for this dead pile of wood, never mention that the crew was only there FOR 13 DAYS? There are no Utah roots to that plane. It was merely one stop out of several.

The aircraft itself has been restored and is on display at the National Air and Science Museum (part of the Smithsonian) in Virginia.

Let's let the rotting wood rot. We can't be spending money over and over on something that's not that important. Really.

rnoble
Pendleton, OR

i find the continual return to a horrific event distasteful---hiroshima seemed necessary at the time but we really do not need to preserve in perpetuity every step along the way---we should feel chagrin and try to move past it---preserving another hanger in the name of honoring a specific part of world war 2 just denigrates all the other parts that receive no such honor but were just as necessary at the time---

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

Re: rnoble | 12:37 p.m. May 21, 2011

The heroes of WWII remembered the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, and they released Japan was prepared to dig in and fight to the last man.

The atomic bombs were dropped saved the live of thousands of American soldiers. Real Americans don't feel chagrin for winning a war they didn't start.

rnoble
Pendleton, OR

winning the war that we did not start is not the point---i recognize it was deemed right at the time---

the point is we do not need to memorialize it any more than we already do---lets move on---

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

The majority of Americans don't feel the need to be chagrined that the lives of thousands of American and Japanese solders were saved by forcing their leaders to surrender. There are consequences associated with starting a war .... and Japan paid the full price.

And American has moved on. We helped Japan rebuild after the war and are a principle trading partner today.

Preserving the Enola Gay hanger is very appropriate.

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

I'm always amazed when I hear of Americans who want to apologize for our victory in the Pacific in WWII.

There are those who think war is a game ..... where neither side is a winner or a loser.

Probably best defines the difference between liberal and conservative thinking.

LDS Liberal
Farmington, UT

Rifleman | 11:52 a.m. May 22, 2011
Salt Lake City, Utah

================

Since you had to drag politics into it....

1. Why aren't Conservatives complaining about taxes and this not being a specific Constitutional requirement.

2. I also thought Conservatives didn't support anything "Gay" -- (a pun on the name of the plane).

Rifleman
Salt Lake City, Utah

Re: LDS Liberal | 7:45 a.m. May 23, 2011

When 'rnoble' put the liberal spin on our victory over Japan and said "we should feel chagrin and try to move past it--" it only seemed appropriate to remind him that the lives of thousands of American (and Japanese) solders were saved because of our use of the atom bomb.

Back in the day of the Enola Gay before the word "Gay" was hijacked it meant merry and happy. Today the word is associated with is associated with depression as evidenced by the fact that lesbian, gay and bisexual teens are five times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers.

Flying Finn
Murray, UT

@Rifleman

Your liberal friends are good at dishing it out but they just don't have any sense of humor when they get it back. The Japanese surrender of the deck of the USS Missouri isn't in today's book of police action plays.

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