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Published: Friday, May 6 2011 7:00 a.m. MDT

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greenman108
Petaluma, CA

at least with a twitter mob mistake, no one dies. back in the day, an angry mob could tar and feather someone, who then dies from suffocation, or the mob could hang the person or would stone the victim. No DNA test, no jury of peers.

I am predicting that the political heirs of Richard M Nixon, who famously had liar mailings put into mailboxes during the morning of his first congressional race, will be starting liar twitters about candidates during the mornings of elections. The combo of anonymous twitter accounts and the speed that rumors fly electronically, make it a sure thing that candidates and their "helpers" will win some races based entirely on mob reactivity to false rumor. At least with the Presidential process, if it happens in the POTUS election, the "electors" have the duty and right to vote for another candidate than the person purportedly elected by the public, ie, twitter mob. We shall see.

Solutions Inspired
Providence, RI

Adam - great piece and sage advice. As part of that mob in that conference I thought that you captured the spirit of the evening perfectly. It was a real case of something spiraling out of control. I agree with your points and believe that whether or not you agree with social media, you can no longer ignore it or more importantly - control it. But you can meet them at the door and engage in conversation.

One of the most salient points in my opinion was the fact that most "customers" do not expect a reply. I find this to be very true. Amazing what some attention can garner you.

People are out there talking, representing, and driving your real and perceived Brand/Service, etc. You had better be on the case!

Keep it up Adam!!!

Janna Goodman
Yuba City, CA

Good ideas for using twitter well!

as11
Lincoln, NE

Twitter may easily be the best engine sifting out the good from the bad. Mainly because of the amount of intelligent (though blunt) people on there!

In the case of the bad conference speaker, I wonder if he was even aware of the power of twitter. I think it's still in its infancy with many people groups and they aren't aware of the negative digital press they're racking up due to their ignorance of social media. I wonder if knew there would be a twitter hashtag for the event; and that people were encouraged to post to twitter during presentations; and I wonder if he realized how that could backfire if he didn't know his audience and what they wanted to hear?

But in the same sense, I feel for the speaker. Sometimes a twitter mob is dead right. This might have been a wakeup call for him to invest in speakers' training.

Regardless of how bad it might have been, I always try to remember that what I say about others will come back around eventually. And on social networks, it comes back on google alerts!

Great post, Adam. Keep it up.

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