Comments about ‘Gov. Gary Herbert visits S.L. high school to discuss nuclear energy’

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Published: Tuesday, March 22 2011 5:04 p.m. MDT

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Baron Scarpia
Logan, UT

I'd love to see the high schools teach students about ALL energy sources. All too often, high schoolers (and adults as well) don't fully understand where their energy comes from -- as long as gas comes out of a pump at 7-11 or electricity comes out of an outlet in their bedroom to juice up an iPod -- energy is relatively an unknown subject.

High schoolers need to know the issues surrounding our oil dependency -- beyond the bumper sticker slogans of "Drill, baby, drill" and "Wind power kills birds." What does it really means to "drill, baby, drill" in rural communities? Why is our air quality is so bad in Utah? How much water is consumed to generate coal- and gas-fired electricity? Why can't we get more wind, solar,and geothermal online?

Why does the government have to finance nuclear plants? Whose responsible for the waste when the nuclear waste companies go out of business? Do the lights really go out when the wind dies or sun sets for wind and solar energy? What about energy storage?

Education will give high schoolers deeper appreciation of the challenges that they'll face in the future.

  • 7:02 a.m. March 23, 2011
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The Utah Republican
Alpine, UT

I'd love to see similar discussions about geothermal power. We have hot springs right here in Salt Lake City that could and should be generating electricity.

Pagan
Salt Lake City, UT

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong...

but dosen't Herbert ONLY have a High school education to begin with?

I do support getting the research for all types of energy. After my own research, I choose not to support nuclear, oil or coal. For very selfish reasons.

I want cleaner air, clean water and...

*'AP IMPACT: US spent-fuel storage sites are packed' - By Ray Henry - AP - Published by DSNews - 03/22/2011

'The U.S. has 71,862 tons of the waste, according to state-by-state numbers obtained by The Associated Press. But the nation has no place to permanently store the material, which stays dangerous for tens of thousands of years.'

I also think BEYOND the short-term needs for energy, as to WHERE are we going to put the 71k tons of waste?

I've heard the suggestion: 'Shoot it into the sun.'

My response would be: 'If we have to shoot it into the sun, how safe IS it?'

All I know, is that solar panels don't create waste that is dangerous...

for tens of thousands of years.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "Pagan | 8:37 a.m." we can take all of the spent fuel and reprocess it, and turn it into new fuel rods/pellets. Yes there is some plutonium left over, but that too can be used as fuel.

Actually, soalar panels do create dangerous waste. In manufacturing the panels, cadmium telluride is used. Last I checked that was a dangerous material. Then, you also have the problem that when the solar panel breaks, that cadmium is released into the environment.

We could discuss the fact that MIT researches (MIT News: Wind resistance) figure that if only 10% of global energy was produced by wind power, temperatures would rise by 1 degree in the areas where the wind turbines are installed.

Plus, lets not forget that solar and wind power plants also require a fuel burning power plant to idle so that when the solar and wind outputs drop they can maintain power production. Just that fact alone should make you shun solar and wind.

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