Comments about ‘Sandstrom revising illegal immigration bill to make enforcement less costly’

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Published: Wednesday, Feb. 9 2011 3:28 p.m. MST

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RRB
SLC, UT

From shall to may will allow police chiefs to stop enforcement in their cities. People like Burbank will just ignore it.

How can we justify paying over 400 million for people here illegally, put 100,000 Utahns out of work, and not be willing to fund a 5-11 million dollar bill for law enforcement?

Something is wrong here.

Bryan
Syracuse, UT

Removing the requirement to investigate would allow certain chiefs (like Burbank) to continue to allow their cities to be sanctuary cities. Enough is enough. When the police run across an illegal alien, they should be able to arrest that person and put him in jail.

tiger1
New York, NY

Which state program is going to be killed to fund this non-sense bill?

Gordonwho
Milville, UT

You who live in the SLC area should bring a lawsuit against the PD for failure to enforce federal laws. They enforce other Federal laws, they should enforce ALL Federal laws.

owlmaster2
Kaysville, UT

What is wrong here is a bill that will cost too much, accomplish nothing and alienate everyone involved.

I lobby and I watch Sandstrom constantly taking his marching orders from Gail Rezika. (however she spells her name) The minority extreme right wing are running this state and it scares me.
Even the conservative legislators are backing off the extremist like Sandstrom an Wimmer.

cjb
Bountiful, UT

This bill is catch and release unless the person has committed a serious crime. (The feds people back only if they are criminals). Given this, this bill is a waste of law enforcement time and resources.

Given the serious cuts that will be made elsewhere this is not the time to adopt ' feel good' legislation.

facts_r_stubborn
Kaysville, UT

I don't agree that Sandstrom's bill will be effective without funding. I also think it is unecessary because cooperative agreements with ICE and local law enforcement already exist in programs like Secure Communities and 287(g). Unfortuately, 287(g) also comes with a price tag and that is why only two Utah counties have implemented it thus far, Weber and Washington.

Having said that, I must applaud Sandstrom for being a reasonable legislator. He is willing to listen and willing to adapt to the realities on the ground. I congratulate the legislature as a whole for the same reasons.

I think my next post is worth re-emphasizing. I have discussed this with posts several times before over that last few months and it is never picked up by either the media, the legislature or the blogasphere. I can't for the life of me figure out why not, since 287(g) has been very effective where ever it has been implemented previously.

Actually, I do know the reason those in authority who know of it are not pursuing it. That's right, it has a price tag! But, it would be well worth the cost.

facts_r_stubborn
Kaysville, UT

Where has Utah been since 1995? We don't need to reinvent the wheel with a Utah bill. All we need to do is to tap into existing Federal programs.

Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1995 authorizes the Federal Government to enter into agreements with state and local law enforcement agencies, permitting officers to perform immigration law enforcement functions, pursuant to a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA.) Local law enforcement officers receive appropriate training and function under the supervision of sworn U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers.

Davidson County, Tennessee claims they saved millions of dollars and reduced crime by deporting illegal aliens under a 287(g) program in operation since April 2007. Thus far 8,000 illegal aliens that committed other crimes have been deported saving approximately $300,000 a week and allowing Davidson County to lease the extra jail space to other law enforcement agencies.

As of 2009 ICE has trained more than 1,000 officers operating under 66 local agreements nationwide. Since January 2006, these 287(g)-trained officers are credited with identifying more than 120,000 individuals who are here illegally.

Utah, get with the program.

facts_r_stubborn
Kaysville, UT

"Whatever the final form, enforcement will have to be well coordinated with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said Shupe, a board member and past president of the Utah Chiefs of Police Association."

Exactly the reason why we shouldn't re-invent the wheel with a copy cat Utah bill. Instead why not get the training and coordination for local law enforcement that ICE is already willing to provide through 287(g)?

"After a meeting with Sandstrom this week, Gov. Gary Herbert said he felt strongly that local government should not be burdened with the enforcement costs."

The Governor is to be applauded. He understands local governments and their extremely tight budgets right now. He is doing the right thing for the right reasons.

I don't always agree with my elected officials or the legislature. But I must say that I am very gratelful for the good, effective and efficient government we have in this state. Overall, I'm grateful to be living in the best run state government in the nation, by national rating groups.

Utah's fiscal conservatism, young educated population and future business growth propects will enable us to lead the nation into economic recovery.

danaslc
Kearns, UT

Sandstrom is our Jan Brewer. It is to bad the Herbert is the same. Someone has to do something to stop the criminal activity and am including those that hire them, the welfare and the drug trade that comes in. Arizona is locking down and those illegals are coming here. Sandstrom rocks and if someone does not think so, go to Arizona. In some areas in Utah we look just like they do.

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