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Comments about ‘Do returned missionaries give BYU a competitive advantage?’

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Published: Friday, Nov. 19 2010 5:30 a.m. MST

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higv
Dietrich, ID

When Ricks College had a team and were clobbering Arizona Schools many of them were complaining about rms. 22 year olds playing jc football. Of course they don't know how a missionary lacks time to prepare, and how come no one said anything when they were losing?

cval
Hyde Park, UT

Funny.... I remember when two years off from athletics was considered a disadvantage. Now its and advantage. What's the difference.... The BYU teams are better now.

Californian#1@94131
San Francisco, CA

Here's the solution for the teams who have 18-year-olds fresh from the senior prom can't compete with BYU's physically, mentally, and spiritually mature RMs.

Recruit grownups. Look for players who have gone out into the real world for a year or two after high school and made a commitment to making a difference. Find military veterans, returned missionaries from any religion, Peace Corps volunteers, and others who have discovered that the world is bigger than 100 yards long, rounder than a free-throw circle, and doesn't revolve around them. Give them closer consideration if they're married and have or are expecting children.

It isn't just older and bigger that gives anyone a competitive advantage. Experience and perspective probably count for more.

Dennis
Harwich, MA

No. Example. This years team.

optimist
Sun City, CA

My honest opinion, is that in most cases, not all, but most cases, if you are a skill player at QB, WR, TE, RB, you are at a disadvantage. You are rusty and others that are fresh out of high school or JC transfers, are better able to take over where you left off before going on the mission.

On the other hand, if you are in a so called non skill position, (all positions require skill and all positions are play making positions), I believe that you do have a big advantage because of the added years of maturity and added years of body size and weight.

Over all, in the perfect world, I would like the top skilled playmakers to have their mission calls be assigned to LES and the others assigned to other states or countries. I recognize that my opinion is a minority opinion, but it is an honest opinion which I believe would be for the good of our Cougars and our University.

optimist
Sun City, CA

A point of view:

Steve Young, Jim MacMahon, Ty Detmer, Sarkasian, where among our best QB's ever. None went on a mission. Young a Mormon, Detmer a convert, MaMahon a Catholic, Sarkasian another non member, but all non return missionaries.

Compare: 5 star Ben Olson, highly recruited James Lark, highly recruited Mumms. Other examples come to mind on each side, but enough said.

Skill position players have a much harder time coming back and being as great as they were before they left while non skill position players have the advantage of maturity, decision making, learning on the job, and body weight and size.

Ask Ben Olson, James Lark and Mumms if they agree.

Californian#1@94131
San Francisco, CA

** "Over all, in the perfect world, I would like the top skilled playmakers to have their mission calls be assigned to LES and the others assigned to other states or countries." **

Not sure what LES means - "local/English speaking"?

Anyway, I guess it's a matter of perspective--dog and tail, so to speak. What is the purpose of BYU? One of its mottoes is "Enter to Learn, Go Forth to Serve."

If the school exists to service the sports programs, produce stars, and win championships, why not simply exempt the top skill players from mission service entirely?

OTOH, what if the school exists to service higher, divinely appointed purposes, and produce well-rounded people eager to make the world a better place? All the sports programs would merely be a means to an end, and the trophies icing on the cake. Without the cake, a ton of icing means nothing.

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