Comments about ‘Health bill would keep prisoners on private insurance’

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Published: Wednesday, Jan. 27 2010 6:09 p.m. MST

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Wake up DN

SO and inmate is in the slammer for 10 years, how does he pay the premiums, and could the insurance company drop them for non-payment. Seems the reporter for DN should have probed deeper and and ask more questions.

Bearone

Hang on to your wallets, people!!!!
Guess how high your health insurance premiums are going to go if this short-sighted bill is passed.

The insurance companies are not going to insure these people for nothing!

Who is going to pay the premiums--the company he no longer works for---the state---the prisioner (who has no job or income?

Come on! Give me a break!!!
I hope this is the only ill-thought bill to be offered---but I really think this is just the start.

Anonymous

What a joke! I guess the insurance companies will need to require a back ground check for all of their clients ( $25-$40 per person ). No more free quotes and higher premiums, gotta love the Gov. and criminals

David

It's funny how those that get elected to the House or Senate in this state, and probably every state, feel they have to pass bills to JUSTIFY their election, so they start thinking of STUPID BILLS to pass, it's like Hollywood remaking earlier made movies, because there are NO new idea's. I would be happy if they would just keep their laptop's on and play their computer games, it would be cheaper for me.

Karen

Bad idea!!!

Casey

A closer look at the bill seems to alleviate the concerns raised here. HB 22. This bill effects a small population of inmates. Those who are dropped because they cannot pay premiums are still covered by the state. Those who are on a spouse's plan or a parent's plan, where the holder is still paying premiums on the incarcerated individual, are the ones who will be receiving care via the insurance provider. The payments are already being made, now the insurance companies will have to provide the coverage they are currently passing on to taxpayers. Furthermore, the insurance companies do not need to foot the bill for problems resulting from incarceration (fights, etc...). Finally, health coverage for these individuals will be significantly cheaper for insurance companies because inmates are fed three times a day, are away from drugs, and do not ski in prison.... If anything, the insurance companies should be praising the bill because they will be receiving the regular premiums for a now lower-risk individual. Taxpayers also should sing. They will not be paying for a cancer patient who is already being paid for.

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