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Comments about ‘How do you say 'snake' in Russian?’

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Published: Tuesday, Oct. 27 2009 12:41 a.m. MDT

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Just a Mom

This might seem like a really nice, caring thing to do...but, then you send them back...to the orphanage? Does this make them happy?...Experience what other (American)kids get to do, and this is what other kids get to have, and this is what a "family" is like...now go back to poverty and no parents, and hope you have a great life... I don't know? Seems right at first, then it seems really wrong. I'm Just sayin'..

Greg

zmeya is snake in russian z-me-ya..

sachok

yea, but how do you say it in Ukrainian?

Agree with Just a Mom

I've lived in Russia for 5 years. It is just WRONG to bring them over here and then send them back. Even the smallest farming town is SHEER luxury compared to the towns of Russia or the Ukraine.

These boys should be adopted. Oh yeah and wonder how much it cost to fly them out here? Maybe 1500 each? And that is close to 1/10 the cost to adopt them. What a waste of MONEY to show these boys what they will never have again in another few weeks.

a mom who loves google

Don't you just love google. If you don't know something, say the mission of Save a Child Foundation. All you have to do is google them to find out why they're bringing older orphans to America for 3 weeks. Thanks for this article. You never know how many lives can be changed through a little education and inspiration.

Anonymous

Snake is "Zmiya" in Ukrainian. Snakes are exist in Ukraine. I don't know why those two kids took a special interests in case of snakes, because nobody like snakes at Ukraine.

Robert

Shouldn't this article be entitled "How do you say 'snake' in Ukrainian?" I think that the Ukraine broke away from Russia for a reason...

Payaso

Snake = Putin

ZMEYA

Accent on "ya"

Mike in Sandy

anonymous

to anonymous: there is no such thing as "at Ukraine"

Deseret Dawg

If the orphans are Ukrainian, then a better title for this story would be "How do you say snake in Ukrainian".

Ukraine was locked in Soviet slavery for 75 years. They are glad to be independent. They should not be looked upon as a Russian appendage.

I do agree with Payaso's comment, however.

Andrea

There is also no such thing as "the Ukraine". And that is great advice to "Agree with just a mom". Read a little bit about what you're slamming before you make such and ignorant comment. The foundation is called 'Save a Child' not 'Save a child for 3 weeks'.

Also, the towns these kids come from are near the border of Russia and they speak Russian most of the time and also Ukrainian.

This is the 4th year this program has taken place and 90% of the kids have been adopted into the families that hosted them, thanks to Save A Child.

I think it is an incredible program and opportunity for these older orphans who are largely overlooked by couples considering adoption to have a chance at something bigger and greater than what happens to them in Ukraine when they hit age 16.

Be thankful you had a better life than they did and be nice to people who want to change that for a child.

Cindy Miller

We hosted with Save a Child in 2007, and even though the young woman we hosted wanted to be adopted by an Italian family she knew well, we met people here and in Ukraine who helped us find our three daughters (all age 14) that we brought home a year ago. Save a Child is a great way to begin what might otherwise be a very scary thing. It's a great way to get to know the kids and see that most are very normal and happy. The people we met through hosting have remained a strong positive support group, and I think this foundation and the adoption agency Adoption Way does wonderful things, and is so professional. I will always be grateful.

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