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Comments about ‘Balancing act: Benefits of family life worth the food, utility costs’

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Published: Wednesday, July 15 2009 12:00 a.m. MDT

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My wife....

went to her family reunion last week and I had to stay behind because I could not get the time off. I called her the next morning and proudly reported to her that I had a vegetarian breakfast. When she asked me what vegetarian breakfast I just had, I proudly said, "Chocolate cookies.".........LOL!!

Just Think...

Many people don't realize all of the "hidden" costs of being single. Just think...

Mr. Kratz gets the benefit of six under one roof when he pays his property tax bill instead of just one.

The Kratz family must water their lawn, pay for air conditioning, and pay for heating--all bills that don't necessary increase with size of family. Furthermore, in many cities, garbage and sewer fees are based upon a standard flat fee and not a usage fee.

Mr. Kratz himself brings up the idea of extra food that would have gone to waste if his family hadn't returned. Ever try to economically buy for just one on a regular basis? It isn't easy with "family size" packaging. The discounts are clearly found by buying food and supplies in bulk quantities.

I COMPLETELY agree that the benefits of family life are worth the costs. I am not anti-family. However, I wish some people would remember that many single people still have a little 13 inch analog television set and are also dreaming of someday being able to afford the movie theater sized monster hdtv for home.

John Charity Spring

This article does a wonderful job of pointing out that the greatness of this Country was established by emphasizing the importance of family life. The family benefits not only the individuals involved, it benefits society as a whole. It is in the family that children are taught the old fashioned values that made this Country great: honesty, loyalty, and respect for others.

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