Comments about ‘Readers' forum: Owls need holes for nest’

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Published: Thursday, July 9 2009 12:04 a.m. MDT

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Doing my part

I have already put several holes in an envelope and sent them to the loggers union.

I also spotted several owls not far from where I live the other day, so now there are more spotted owls thanks to me.

Good solution

But wacko environmentalists won't want to hear it. They are primarily interested in stopping the removal of old-growth. The owls are their excuse to stop progress and hamstring industry.

Hypocrisy

We need oil.

Take out the stupid trees and start building wells! Pronto!

Anonymous

BURN ALL THE FORRESTS!

wallofvoodoo

Sounds like a good idea, wonder why they wouldn't do it.

doing your part:

Thanks for your fine service.

@wallofvoodoo

"Sounds like a good idea, wonder why they wouldn't do it."

Er...ah... because it's a good idea?

Consequences

Despite the fact that logging has all but stopped in the pacific northwest because of the spotted owl, the US is still using as much wood (a renewable resource)as ever. The decreased supply from the pacific northwest has been more than made up by increased imports from countries which have lower environmental standards on timbering operatons, creating a greater overall negative impact on mother earth than if logging had continued in the pacific northwest. This what the environmentalists really want - to protect their own back yard even if it trashes everyone else's back yard.

Aldo

Americans advanced across a relatively unexploited landscape, and logged old growth forests in New England, the East Coast, then the Midwest, and finally the Pacific. You will find precious few old growth forests in any of these places now, except for the Pacific Northwest. There, we stopped short of converting all of the biggest trees into lumber. In these other places, such as Wisconsin, the whole timber industry has had to retool to fit the new circumstances; that is, to fit an emerging second-growth forest which offered different quantities and types of wood. If all of the above "log it or lose it" people had their way, we'd log out the remaining old growth, and STILL face the aftermath of a wood products industry dependent on second growth. In that sense, old growth is nonl-renewable, like oil; humans simply won't wait for 250 years for old growth to return. After all, that's how long our nation has existed. Old growth produces a number of unique resources, including endangered species that require it, but also some of our cleanest water, hunting, fishing, tourism, etc. Go to Forks, Washington, and see what the alternative is.

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