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Comments about ‘What others say: Arizona's bad law’

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Published: Friday, Dec. 16 2011 12:00 a.m. MST

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cjb
Bountiful, UT

Yesterday it the federal government came out with results of an investigation on this sheriff. He regularly discrininates against latinos. When confronted with this, instead of looking at his practices to see where he could improve, he accused the federal government of hurting the nation by coming out with this study.

Thank goodness the federal government does involve itself in what conservatives would consider to be states affairs, otherwise the south would still have slaves, Jim Crow laws would exist all throughout the nation and sheriffs like this Arizona sheriff would be allowed free reign.

RanchHand
Huntsville, UT

Am I reading the Deseret News?

Redshirt1701
Deep Space 9, Ut

The funny thing is that the Federal Government only cares if a state is trying to enforce Federal Law. However, if a state decides to make laws that ignore federal law the Federal Government ignores it.

Why would the Federal Government only go after states that are saving it money by enforcing federal laws? Is there some sort of alterior motive involved here?

Dektol
Powell, OH

Illegal immigration is against the law. What is wrong with these officers enforcing it? Seems to me the Feds are the ones pushing lawbreaking by not enforcing these laws.

wrz
Salt Lake, UTah

"By turning police officers into immigration agents, it distracts them from needed local law enforcement..."

If illegals were removed from Arizona they would have the funds to hire more law enforcement.

"Latinos understandably fear that any contact with law enforcement may land them or a relative in deportation proceedings."

Latinos will never turn their kind in, illegal or not.

"The problem with Arizona's law is precisely that it sets out to tell the Department of Homeland Security how to do its job."

That's specious. Arizona's law simply enforces federal immigration law.

"It allows Arizona police to decide who is to be deported..."

Not so. Arizona police merely identify illegals in the normal conduct of law enforcement duties, turning illegals over to federal authorities for action.

"The reality is that the federal government doesn't have the manpower or resources to deport the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants living in the country."

And since the federal government doesn't have the manpower, it should be more than excited about help from states. It is fairly obvious that direction from Obama to go easy on illegals is pure and simple a political decision to garner the Hispanic vote.

Neanderthal
Salt Lake, UTah

@cjb:

"Thank goodness the federal government does involve itself in what conservatives would consider to be states affairs, otherwise the south would still have slaves..."

Slavery still exists... Immigrants are paid slave wages which they willingly accept. However, this depresses wages to the point where Americans can't take the work and go on unemployment.

Send illegals home and wage levels will rise to a point where Americans can again become employed, removing them off the unemployed.

procuradorfiscal
Tooele, UT

Re: "The reality is that the federal government doesn't have the manpower or resources . . . . For that reason, the Obama administration has set clear priorities that focus on deporting criminals who pose a risk to communities."

What a cynical and transparent prevarication!

If the real reason the feds won't enforce their own law had anything to do with resources, they'd welcome assistance of state authorities -- just like they do with enforcement of federal environmental, drug trafficking, securities regulation, banking, and host of other laws.

Resources are the very last thing on the minds of the political hacks and flacks in charge of the Obama administration "Justice" department, as evidence by the millions spent each year to assure the law is NOT enforced.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

Whenever I'm in maricopa county I am glad I look, well, 'canadian'.

RRB
SLC, UT

Your stand on illegal labor is very transparent Deseret news.

Brer Rabbit
Spanish Fork, UT

Part of the AZ law has already been approved by the Supreme Court. States and local governments may create ordinances that suspend or revoke the business license of employers of illegal aliens. States and local governments like Washington County that create such ordinances (E-Verify) will soon have fewer illegal aliens in their communities since jobs is the primary magnet.

After most of the illegal workers have gone elsewhere and law enforcement removes the criminal element such as drug dealing, producing fraudulent documents, etc local communities will be able to deal with the rest of the problem.

If the state passes an enforceable E-Verify law that suspends or revokes business licenses of the employers of illegal alien, the number of illegal aliens in Utah will decrease dramatically. When these illegal workers leave the state, or don't come in the first place, Utah taxpayers will see a very significant savings.

anti-liar
Salt Lake City, UT

This editorial is not a letter to the editor of the Deseret News. Rather, it is the editorial of a newspaper of a city that is several hundred miles away, which the Deseret News is choosing to import -- with no side-by-side counterpoint -- into its newspaper.

Thus, the Los Angeles Times' opinion arguably may be considered the Deseret News' opinion, as well.

My opinion is that it is a shame that the Deseret News and its owners would adopt or share an opinion that consists almost completely of purposeful falsehoods and distortions from beginning to end.

What the papers really are concerned about is the possibility of legitimate state policies of enforcement of Federal immigration law interfering with rogue Federal policies of non-enforcement of Federal immigration law.

Such enforcement at the local level is exactly what is needed.

It invites not a shred more abuse than any other law or ordinance.

Even if the papers' dishonest implication -- that Arpaio's efforts have been worthless -- were true, he still is doing the right thing by the law, by the U.S. Constitution, and by the American people.

But, then again, these two newspapers don't seem to share this value.

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