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Comments about ‘Utah Jazz: Corbin makes a major shift in team's defensive philosophy’

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Published: Wednesday, Dec. 14 2011 9:00 p.m. MST

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bgl
Santa Monica, CA

I think that they should take a shift back to Jazz/Jerry Sloan defense. It involves toughness. Haven't seen it used in a while.

Uncle Rico
Sandy, UT

You mean we don't have to watch other teams knock down open 3's all year long anymore?

eagle
Provo, UT

You're right Uncle Rico, now they can drive down the lane and dunk on the Jazz's heads...

chiefbrady
Salt Lake City, UT

I'm glad they're ditching the antiquated Sloan methods. Coaches need to design their strategies around the players on the roster and not by making players fit roles that were designed in the 60's.

BGuy
Falls Church, VA

I'm all for it. Sloan's defense wasn't effective in the league where there are so many good shooters. If rotations work better in this offense, hopefully there will be a few less wide open shooters on the floor.

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

Corbin makes a major shift in team's defensive philosophy? You mean, like teaching them to play it?

sportsfan2k10
Cottonwood Heights, UT

So glad to see Corbin recognizing the fact that the Jazz were horrendous on defense last year! Defense wins championships! We have got plenty of talented scorers on the roster. These young guys need to focus on locking down the other team defensively. The fact that Ty is making this his first order of business, I think, speaks volumes about the type of coach he is going to be for the Jazz in the long term. A great leader who knows how to analyze his players individually and his team as a whole, in order to find ways to improve. Love it coach! Keep it up!!

WhatsInItForMe
Orem, Utah

Love what Corbin's doing---so far. Can't wait to see who plays where and when.

Basketballogy
Orem, UT

The Utah Jazz ranked 23 out of 30 teams last season in defensive rating, so there definitely is room for improvement on the defensive side of the floor.

I saw Phil Jackson running a Lakers practice his first season with the Lakers back in 1999, when they had Shaq. The Lakers had the highest defensive rating in the NBA that season (98.2), and no one knew it at the time, but they were on their way to the first of what would be 3 championships in a row.

Without giving too much away, Coach Jackson was teaching his players to force the ball to the sides of the court. I felt tremendously affirmed, because that's what I'd been teaching my teams since I started coaching in 1996.

Forcing the ball to the side limits the ball handler's passing and driving options, while allowing the defense on the weak side to sag off their men and be a step closer to giving help or rotating.

However, the philosophy has its weaknesses too.

There are some teams with players that are just too deadly on the baseline, and they can make you pay. Kobe Bryant with his money baseline turnaround J, and Miami's Shane Battier with his corner 3s come to mind.

Because there are teams with players that may force the Jazz to do something else, I hope the Jazz are also looking at a zone like Dallas used when they swept the Lakers last season.

Alternating between those two defensive schemes looks like a proven way in the modern era to keep your opponents in check.

glowe88
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

Great article on a much needed change to the team's defensive scheme. Green Seat Report advocated this type of defense several weeks ago for a couple of important reasons (some of them addressed here as well): it will limit opponents three-pointers and it will limit opponents free-throw attempts. I'm looking forward to watching a much improved team very soon.

21lowe
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

With the talent/potential of the Jazz roster, a solid offense, and now what should be a much-improved defense, the Jazz should be a strong team in the west. Greenseatreport had some insights about the need for this type of defense and how it can help the team

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